Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Blood lead is a predictor of homocysteine levels in a population-based study of older adults.

Authors
Schafer-JH; Glass-TA; Bressler-J; Todd-AC; Schwartz-BS
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2005 Jan; 113(1):31-35
NIOSHTIC No.
20037526
Abstract
Lead and homocysteine are both associated with cardiovascular disease and cognitive dysfunction. We evaluated the relations among blood lead, tibia lead, and homocysteine levels by cross-sectional analysis of data among subjects in the Baltimore Memory Study, a longitudinal study of 1,140 randomly selected residents in Baltimore, Maryland, who were 50-70 years of age. Tibia lead was measured by 109Cd K-shell X-ray fluorescence. The subject population had a mean SD age of 59.3 5.9 years and was 66.0% female, 53.9% white, and 41.4% black or African American. Mean SD blood lead, tibia lead, and homocysteine levels were 3.5 2.4 g/dL, 18.9 12.5 g/g, and 10.0 4.1 mol/L, respectively. In unadjusted analysis, blood lead and homocysteine were moderately correlated (Pearson's r = 0.27, p < 0.01). After adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational level, tobacco and alcohol consumption, and body mass index using multiple linear regression, results revealed that homocysteine levels increased 0.35 mol/L per 1.0 g/dL increase in blood lead (p < 0.01). The relations of blood lead with homocysteine levels did not differ in subgroups distinguished by age, sex, or race/ethnicity. Tibia lead was modestly correlated with blood lead (Pearson's r = 0.12, p < 0.01) but was not associated with homocysteine levels. To our knowledge, these are the first data to reveal an association between blood lead and homocysteine. These results suggest that homocysteine could be a mechanism that underlies the effects of lead on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems, possibly offering new targets for intervention to prevent the long-term consequences of lead exposure.
Keywords
Lead-compounds; Cardiovascular-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Blood-disorders; Author Keywords: Blood lead; Cross-sectional study; Homocysteine; Tibia lead
Contact
B.S. Schwartz, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, 615 North Wolfe St., Room W7041, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
7439-92-1
Publication Date
20050101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
bschwart@jhsph.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2005
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
MD; NY
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
TOP