Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Recruitment, retention, and compliance results from a probability study of children's environmental health in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Authors
Sexton-K; Adgate-JL; Church-TR; Greaves-IA; Ramachandran-G; Fredrickson-AL; Geisser-MS; Ryan-AD
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2003 May; 111(5):731-736
NIOSHTIC No.
20037452
Abstract
The School Health Initiative: Environment, Learning, and Disease (SHIELD) study used a probability sample of children (second through fifth grades) from two low-income and racially mixed neighborhoods of Minneapolis, Minnesota, to assess childhood environmental health. Children were eligible to participate in SHIELD regardless of whether they or their families spoke a foreign language, their household had a telephone, or they were enrolled in a special education program. The overall enrollment rate in year 1 was 57%, with a substantial disparity between children from English-speaking (42%) versus non-English-speaking (71%) families. At the end of year 1, 85% were retained in the study. A relatively high percentage of children provided the two requested blood (82%) and urine (86%) samples in year 1, and 90% provided a valid spirometry sample. Eighty-two percent provided both requested volatile organic chemical badge samples, and both time-activity logs were obtained from 66%. However, only 32% provided both peak flow measurements. All percentages increased for those participating in the second year of the study. Results indicate that a school-based research design makes it feasible and practical to conduct probability-based assessments of children's environmental health in economically disadvantaged and ethnically diverse neighborhoods. There is an ongoing need, however, to improve understanding of the cultural, economic, psychologic, and social determinants of study participation among this population.
Keywords
Airborne-particles; Air-contamination; Allergic-reactions; Allergies; Biohazards; Biological-effects; Biological-factors; Chemical-hypersensitivity; Demographic-characteristics; Environmental-exposure; Environmental-factors; Environmental-hazards; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Indoor-environmental-quality; Mathematical-models; Organic-chemicals; Public-health; Physiological-effects; Physiological-response; Quantitative-analysis; Racial-factors; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Seasonal-factors; Statistical-analysis; Author Keywords: asthma; children; enrollment; environmental tobacco smoke; low-income; lung function; metals; minorities; pesticides; probability sample; recruitment; retention; volatile organic chemicals
Contact
K. Sexton, MMC 807, Room 1260, Minnesota School of Public Health, 420 Delaware St., SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
CODEN
EVHPAZ
Publication Date
20030501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ksexton@umn.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008434
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
MN; GA
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
TOP