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Indoor moulds, Sick Building Syndrome and building related illness.

Authors
Crook-B; Burton-NC
Source
Fungal Biol Rev 2010 Aug-Nov; 24(3-4):106-113
NIOSHTIC No.
20037425
Abstract
Humans are constantly exposed to fungi, or moulds, usually without suffering harm to health. However, in some instances inhalation of sufficient numbers of mould spores can trigger symptoms of asthma, rhinitis or bronchitis. Respiratory ill health associated with the built environment is often referred to either as Sick Building Syndrome [SBS] (i.e. building related symptoms) or building related illness. For many, the difference between SBS and building related illness is unclear and the two overlap. This review examines the differences between the two and describes in more detail the role of moulds in building related illness. Using as examples the after-effects of flooding in the UK in 2007, and Hurricane Katrina in USA in 2005, methods used to investigate exposure to indoor mould contamination are described, together with strategies for remediating mould contaminated buildings.
Keywords
Airborne-particles; Allergens; Allergic-reactions; Allergies; Bacteria; Bacterial-dusts; Bacterial-infections; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Fungal-diseases; Fungal-infections; Fungi; Humans; Immune-reaction; Immunologic-disorders; Indoor-air-pollution; Molds; Ventilation; Ventilation-systems; Author Keywords: Building related illness; Building remediation; Indoor air; Mould; Sick Building Syndrome
Contact
Brian Crook, Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton SK179JN, UK
Publication Date
20100801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
brian.crook@hsl.gov.uk
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
3-4
ISSN
1749-4613
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Services
Source Name
Fungal Biology Reviews
State
OH
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