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Antibiotic resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Enterococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. recovered from the indoor air of a large-scale swine-feeding operation.

Authors
Sapkota-AR; Ojo-KK; Roberts-MC; Schwab-KJ
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol 2006 Nov; 43(5):534-540
NIOSHTIC No.
20037403
Abstract
AIMS: In this study, multidrug-resistant bacteria previously recovered from the indoor air of a large-scale swine-feeding operation were tested for the presence of five macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes and five tetracycline (tet) resistance genes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Enterococcus spp. (n = 16) and Streptococcus spp. (n =16) were analysed using DNA-DNA hybridization, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oligoprobing of PCR products. All isolates carried multiple MLS resistance genes, while 50% of the Enterococcus spp. and 44% of the Streptococcus spp. also carried multiple tet resistance genes. All Enterococcus spp. carried erm(A) and erm(B), 69% carried erm(F), 44% carried mef(A), 75% carried tet(M), 69% carried tet(L) and 19% carried tet(K). All Streptococcus spp. carried erm(B), 94% carried erm(F), 75% carried erm(A), 38% carried mef(A), 50% carried tet(M), 81% carried tet(L) and 13% carried tet(K). CONCLUSIONS: Multidrug resistance among airborne bacteria recovered from a swine operation is encoded by multiple MLS and tet resistance genes. These are the first data regarding resistance gene carriage among airborne bacteria from swine-feeding operations. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: The high prevalence of multiple resistance genes reported here suggests that airborne Gram-positive bacteria from swine operations may be important contributors to environmental reservoirs of resistance genes.
Keywords
Bacteria; Genes; Air-samples; Air-contamination; Indoor-air-pollution; Microorganisms; Indoor-environmental-quality; Author Keywords: Airborne bacteria; Antibiotic resistance genes; Enterococcus; Multidrug resistance; Streptococcus; Swine
Contact
Kellogg J. Schwab PhD, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St, Room E6620, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103
CODEN
LAMIE7
Publication Date
20061101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
kschwab@jhsph.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0266-8254
Source Name
Letters in Applied Microbiology
State
MD
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
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