Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

A norovirus outbreak at a long-term-care facility: the role of environmental surface contamination.

Authors
Wu-HM; Fornek-M; Schwab-KJ; Chapin-AR; Gibson-K; Schwab-E; Spencer-C; Henning-K
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2005 Oct; 26(10):802-810
NIOSHTIC No.
20037390
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The role of environmental surface contamination in the propagation of norovirus outbreaks is unclear. An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis was reported among residents of a 240-bed veterans long-term-care facility. OBJECTIVES: To identify the likely mode of transmission, to characterize risk factors for illness, and to evaluate for environmental contamination in this norovirus outbreak. METHODS: An outbreak investigation was conducted to identify risk factors for illness among residents and employees. Stool and vomitus samples were tested for norovirus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Fourteen days after outbreak detection, ongoing cases among the residents prompted environmental surface testing for norovirus by RT-PCR. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-seven (52%) of 246 residents and 84 (46%) of 181 surveyed employees had gastroenteritis. Case-residents did not differ from non-case-residents by comorbidities, diet, room type, or level of mobility. Index cases were among the nursing staff. Eight of 11 resident stool or vomitus samples tested positive for genogroup II norovirus. The all-cause mortality rate during the month of the outbreak peak was significantly higher than the expected rate. Environmental surface swabs from case-resident rooms, a dining room table, and an elevator button used only by employees were positive for norovirus. Environmental and clinical norovirus sequences were identical. CONCLUSION: Extensive contamination of environmental surfaces may play a role in prolonged norovirus outbreaks and should be addressed in control interventions.
Keywords
Infection-control; Infectious-diseases; Environmental-contamination; Environmental-exposure; Gastrointestinal-system; Gastrointestinal-system-disorders; Viral-infections; Viral-diseases
Contact
Henry Wu, MD, Drexel University College of Medicine, Mailstop 461, 245 N. 15th St., Philadelphia, PA 19102
CODEN
ICEPE3
Publication Date
20051001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
hwu@drexelmed.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
0899-823X
Source Name
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
State
MD; PA
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
TOP