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Asthma, atopy, and lung function among racially diverse, poor inner-urban Minneapolis schoolchildren.

Authors
Greaves-IA; Sexton-K; Blumenthal-MN; Church-TR; Adgate-JL; Ramachandrana-G; Fredrickson-AL; Ryan-AD; Geisser-MS
Source
Environ Res 2007 Feb; 103(2):257-266
NIOSHTIC No.
20037387
Abstract
As part of an assessment of schoolchildren's environmental exposures and health, a probability sample of 136 children from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds was drawn from grades 2-5 of two inner-urban Minneapolis schools (Whittier, Lyndale). Questionnaires were administered to a parent/guardian; blood samples for IgE and lung function tests were obtained. Overall adjusted rates for lifetime asthma (15.4%; 95%CI 9.3-21.5%), asthma in the last 12 months (13.6%; 7.8-19.4%), and current asthma medication use (10.5%; 5.3-15.7%) were higher than reported US national rates. Adjusted rates for lifetime physician-diagnosed asthma differed significantly among racial/ethnic groups (Po0.01): African-Americans (25.9%), White/Others (25.8%), Hispanics (9.3%), Somalis (1.8%), Asians (0%). Corresponding rates for atopy (total IgE4100 IU/mL or an allergen-specific IgE40.35 IU/mL) were: African-Americans (66.6%), White/Others (100%), Hispanics (77.2%), Somalis (78.1%), Asians (81.8%). Lung function (FEV1, FVC) was analyzed by linear regression using log-transformed data: significant race-specific differences in lung function were found relative to White/Others (Po0.001 for each racial/ethnic group): African-Americans (FEV1 -16.5%, FVC -16.9%), Somalis (-22.7%, -26.8%), Hispanics (-12.2%, -11.4%) and Asians (-11.1%, -12.4%). Females had significantly lower FEV1 (-8.8%) and FVC (-11.0%) than males. An unexplained, significant difference in children's lung function was found between the two schools. A history of physician-diagnosed asthma was not associated with decreased lung function. Factors other than poverty, inner-urban living, and IgE levels (atopy) need to be considered in the development of childhood asthma.
Keywords
Allergic-reactions; Allergies; Humans; Immune-reaction; Lung-function; Pulmonary-disorders; Pulmonary-function; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Racial-factors; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-infections; Respiratory-irritants; Respiratory-system-disorders; Author Keywords: Minority children; Asthma; Atopy; Home and school environments; Lung function
Contact
Ian A. Greaves, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, MMC 807, 420 Delaware Street. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455
CODEN
ENVRAL
Publication Date
20070201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
igreaves@umn.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008434
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0013-9351
Source Name
Environmental Research
State
MN; TX
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
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