Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Olfactory function in workers exposed to styrene in the reinforced-plastics industry.

Authors
Dalton-P; Cowart-B; Dilks-D; Gould-M; Lees-PSJ; Stefaniak-A; Emmett-E
Source
Am J Ind Med 2003 Jul; 44(1):1-11
NIOSHTIC No.
20037242
Abstract
Background: Impairment of olfactory function in humans has been associated with occupational exposure to volatile chemicals. To investigate whether exposure to styrene was associated with olfactory impairment, olfactory function was examined in workers with a minimum of 4 years exposure to styrene in the reinforced-plastics industry (current mean exposure: 26 ppm, range: 10-60 ppm; historic mean dose: 156 ppm-years, range: 13.8-328 ppm-years) and in a group of age- and gender-matched, unexposed controls. Methods: Olfactory function was assessed using a standardized battery that included tests of threshold sensitivity for phenylethyl alcohol (PEA), odor identification ability, and retronasal odor perception. Odor detection thresholds for styrene were also obtained as a measure of specific adaptation to the work environment. Results: No differences were observed between exposed workers and controls on tests of olfactory function. Elevation of styrene odor detection thresholds among exposed workers indicated exposure-induced adaptation. Conclusions: The present study found no evidence among a cross-section of reinforcedplastics industry workers that current or historical exposure to styrene was associated with impairment of olfactory function. Taken together with anatomical differences between rodent and human airways and the lack of evidence for styrene metabolism in human nasal tissue, the results strongly suggest that at these concentrations, styrene is not an olfactory toxicant in humans.
Keywords
Chemical-reactions; Chemical-industry-workers; Olfactory-disorders; Exposure-levels; Exposure-limits; Styrenes; Plastic-products; Nasal-disorders; Plastics-industry; Author Keywords: olfactory function; styrene; occupational exposure; nasal effects; adaptation
CODEN
AJIMD8
CAS No.
100-42-5
Publication Date
20030701
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
MD; PA
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
TOP