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Metabolic syndrome and salivary cortisol: is there dysregulation among a group of active duty urban police officers?

Authors
Austin-Ketch-TL; Violanti-J; Fekedulegn-D; Andrew-ME; Burchfiel-C; Hartley-T; Vena-JE
Source
Diabetes Metab Syndr 2010 Apr/Jun; 4(2):82-88
NIOSHTIC No.
20036955
Abstract
Objective: Examine metabolic syndrome risk and cortisol patterns in an actively employed group of urban police officers. Methods: A total of 102 actively employed Upstate New York police officers were randomly selected. Metabolic syndrome risk factor determinations were obtained during a scheduled clinic visit and salivary cortisol measures were subsequently obtained over the next 24 h. Results: 24% of male police offers demonstrated metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines. Only one female officer met the criteria for metabolic syndrome; however, she declined to participate in the cortisol portion of the study. Among male officers were the most prevalent risk factors, while female officers most often exhibited as the most commonly identified risk factors. The various cortisol measures produced mixed results. Area under the curve cortisol did demonstrate moderate dysregulation. Conclusion: Cortisol dysregulation is evident among the male officers with metabolic syndrome who participated in the study. Of interest among those officers with only two syndrome characteristics, dysregulation of awakening area under the curve cortisol measures was also apparent. Continued monitoring of the officer population for manifest diabetic and cardiovascular disease should be undertaken.
Keywords
Police-officers; Law-enforcement; Law-enforcement-workers; Emergency-responders; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Metabolic-disorders; Men; Women; Humans; Endocrine-system-disorders; Author Keywords: Metabolic syndrome; Salivary cortisol; Occupational cohort; Police force; Cardiovascular risk factors
Contact
Tammy L. Austin-Ketch, School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York 314 Wende Hall, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
Publication Date
20100401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
tlak@buffalo.edu
Funding Type
Purchase Order
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Purchase-Order-HELD01B0088
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1871-4021
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Services: Public Safety
Source Name
Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews
State
WV; NY; GA
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