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Noise.

Authors
Dunn-DE; Marenberg-ME
Source
Textbook of Clinical Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Rosenstock L, Cullen MR, eds., Philadelphia, PA: W.B. Saunders Company, 1994 Jul; :673-680
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20036927
Abstract
Noise is one of the most prevalent workplace hazards. Hearing loss caused by noise is also one of the oldest known occupational diseases. Ramazini identified noise-induced hearing loss in the 1700s when the noise was almost exclusively from the hammer of carpenters, blacksmiths, or other smiths. The general mechanization of industry, farming , and transportation, not only increased the range of occupations that exposed workers to noise, but also for the first time introduced significant exposure to uninterrupted or continuous noise. Noise, in settings other than the workplace (such as living near an airport), is also a rising environmental concern. Because these exposures, however, are usually not as intensive as those in the occupational setting, this chapter will primarily focus on the hazardous effects of excessive noise exposure in the workplace.
Keywords
Occupational-hazards; Occupational-exposure; Hearing-loss; Occupations; Noise; Noise-exposure; Sound; Auditory-system; Noise-induced-hearing-loss; Noise-measurement; Noise-transmission; Sound-attenuation; Audiometry; Noise-levels; Noise-control; Noise-frequencies; Hearing-conservation; Standards; Work-environment; Work-performance; Exposure-limits; Ears; Sensory-thresholds; Cell-damage; Cardiovascular-function
Publication Date
19940701
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Editors
Rosenstock-L; Cullen-MR
Fiscal Year
1994
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
0721634826
NIOSH Division
DBBS
Source Name
Textbook of Clinical Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH; CT
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