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Emerging exposures and respiratory health: World Trade Center dust.

Authors
Rom-WN; Reibman-J; Rogers-L; Weiden-MD; Oppenheimer-B; Berger-K; Goldring-R; Harrison-D; Prezant-D
Source
Proc Am Thorac Soc 2010 May; 7(2):142-145
NIOSHTIC No.
20036762
Abstract
The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) on 9/11/2001 produced a massive dust cloud with acute exposure, and the rubble pile burning over 3 months exposed more than 300,000 residents, rescue workers, and clean-up workers. Firefighters in the New York City Fire Department had significant respiratory symptoms characterized by cough, dyspnea, gastroesophageal reflux, and nasal stuffiness with a significant 1-year decline in FVC and FEV(1). Bronchial hyperreactivity measured by methacholine challenge correlated with bronchial wall thickening on CT scans. Compared with the NHANES III data for FVC and FEV(1), 32% of 2,000 WTC dust-exposed residents and clean-up workers were below the lower 5th percentile. The most common abnormality was a low FVC pattern, a finding similar to that also described for individuals in rescue and recovery activities. Among those complaining of respiratory symptoms and normal spirometry, almost half had abnormalities detected with impedance oscillometry consistent with distal airways' disease. Follow-up with the WTC Health Registry and the WTC Environmental Health Center will help discern whether treatment with anti-inflammatory medications or bronchodilators in those with respiratory symptoms may prevent the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Keywords
Allergens; Dust-exposure; Dust-measurement; Dust-particles; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Inhalation-studies; Lung; Lung-disorders; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-health; Occupational-respiratory-disease; Particle-aerodynamics; Particle-counters; Particulate-dust; Particulates; Public-health; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-infections; Respiratory-irritants; Respiratory-system-disorders; Statistical-analysis; Work-areas; Work-environment; Work-operations; Work-performance; Author Keywords: World Trade Center Dust; distal airway
Contact
William N. Rom M.D., MPH, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 550 1st Ave., New York, NY 10016
CODEN
PATSBB
Publication Date
20100501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
william.rom@med.nyu.edu
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Grant
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U10-OH-008223; Grant-Number-E11-OH-009630; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U10-OH-008243; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U10-OH-008242
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1546-3222
Source Name
Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society
State
NY; GA; NJ
Performing Organization
New York University School of Medicine
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