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Working to eat: vulnerability, food insecurity, and obesity among migrant and seasonal farmworker families.

Authors
Borre-K; Ertle-L; Graff-M
Source
Am J Ind Med 2010 Apr; 53(4):443-462
NIOSHTIC No.
20036733
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Food insecurity and obesity have potential health consequences for migrant and seasonal farm workers (MSFW). METHODS: Thirty-six Latino MSFW working in eastern North Carolina whose children attended Migrant Head Start completed interviews, focus groups and home visits. Content analysis, nutrient analysis, and non-parametric statistical analysis produced results. RESULTS: MSFW (63.8%) families were food insecure; of those, 34.7% experienced hunger. 32% of pre-school children were food insecure. Food secure families spent more money on food. Obesity was prevalent in adults and children but the relationship to food insecurity remains unclear. Strategies to reduce risk of foods insecurity were employed by MSFW, but employer and community assistance is needed to reduce their risk. CONCLUSIONS: Food insecurity is rooted in the cultural lifestyle of farmwork, poverty, and dependency. MSFW obesity and food insecurity require further study to determine the relationship with migration and working conditions. Networking and social support are important for MSFW families to improve food security. Policies and community/workplace interventions could reduce risk of food insecurity and improve the health of workers.
Keywords
Agricultural-industry; Agricultural-machinery Agricultural-processes; Agricultural-workers; Agriculture; Children; Demographic-characteristics; Farmers; Health-hazards; Health-standards; Occupational-health; Psychological-effects; Psychological-processes; Psychological-responses; Psychological-stress; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Statistical-analysis; Tractors; Training; Transportation; Weight-factors; Author Keywords: food security; hunger; migrant farmworkers; farmworker occupational health risk
Contact
Dr. Kristen Borre, Department of Anthropology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20100401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
kristenborre@rocketmail.com
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U50-OH-007551
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
NC
Performing Organization
East Carolina University
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