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Health hazard evaluation report: HETA-2009-0121-3106, evaluation of exposures to healthcare personnel from cisplatin during a mock interperitoneal operation, University Medical Center, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Authors
Couch-J; Burr-G
Source
Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, HETA 2009-0121-3106, 2010 Mar; :1-21
NIOSHTIC No.
20036599
Abstract
On March 24, 2009, NIOSH received a management request for an HHE at the UMC, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The HHE request was submitted because a new medical procedure was being proposed, and some hospital staff were concerned about potential exposures to cisplatin. On May 11-12, 2009, we visited UMC to evaluate potential exposures to cisplatin during a mock demonstration of the new interperitoneal procedure. We collected GA and PBZ air samples and wipe samples for cisplatin. We evaluated the effectiveness of the chemotherapy-approved gloves worn by the employees by asking employees to wear cotton gloves beneath their chemotherapy-approved gloves. These cotton glove samples were then analyzed for cisplatin. No cisplatin was detected in any GA air samples (MDC = 0.016 microg/m3), personal breathing zone air samples (MDC = 0.058 microg/m3), or cotton glove samples (LOD = 0.009 microg/sample). Cisplatin was detected above the LOQ of 0.031 microg/sample on one of the 15 wipe samples taken. This surface wipe sample was taken on the operating room floor near the surgical technician. No cisplatin was detected in surface wipe samples taken in the same area both prior to the interperitoneal procedure and after the room was sanitized (LOD = 0.007 microg/sample). This suggests that the UMC environmental services staff effectively removed any cisplatin contamination following the interperitoneal procedure. We recommend that employees continue to double-glove by wearing two pairs of chemotherapy-protective gloves. We also recommend that management stress to employees the importance of minimizing splashes and spills. Cisplatin solution splashes or spills should be cleaned up promptly with proper disposal in chemotherapy receptacles.
Keywords
Region-9; Health-care-personnel; Medical-personnel; Medical-treatment; Chemotherapy; Drug-therapy; Work-practices; Protective-clothing; Personal-protection; Gloves; Author Keywords: General Medical and Surgical Hospitals; cisplatin; antineoplastic drugs; air samples; surface wipe samples; glove samples
CAS No.
15663-27-1
Publication Date
20100301
Document Type
Field Studies; Hazard Evaluation and Technical Assistance
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
PB2010-107515
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
HETA-2009-0121-3106
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Services
SIC Code
NAICS-622110
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
NV; OH
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