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Differences in dynamic sound intensity-airflow measurements during cough as a result of obstructive lung disease.

Authors
Goldsmith-T; Reynolds-J; Day-J; Afshari-A; Barkley-J; Frazer-DG
Source
BMES 2009: Bridging the 3 Rivers of Biology, Engineering and Medicine. 2009 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), October 7-10, 2009, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Landover, MD: Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), 2009 Oct; :1
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20036451
Abstract
The intensity of the sound energy produced during a voluntary cough fluctuates as a function of airflow. The objective of this study was to determine if there are differences in the relationship between the sound energy and airflow characteristics of coughs generated by control subjects and subjects with obstructive lung disease. In order to determine how sound intensity and airflow were related, volunteer subjects were asked to cough into a system that was capable of simultaneously measuring both airflow and sound pressure [1]. Measured values of sound intensity were plotted as a function of airflow for coughs from control subjects [n=52] and subjects with lung disease [n=48]. In most cases, sound intensity increased with airflow during the initial portion of the expiratory phase of the coughs of all subjects. After peak flow was reached, there were significant differences between the sound intensity generated by control and disease groups. Subjects with obstructive lung disease had a higher percentage of the total cough sound energy following peak airflow (51%) when compared to control subjects (41%). This resulted in greater hysteresis of the sound intensity versus airflow curves for control subjects when compared to subjects with lung disease.
Keywords
Humans; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Lung-disease; Lung-disorders; Diagnostic-techniques; Diagnostic-tests; Author Keywords: Voluntary Cough; Cough Sound Intensity; Cough Airflow Pattern; Obstructive Lung Disease
Contact
Travis Goldsmith, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Health Effects Laboratory Division, Engineering and Control Technology Branch, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505
Publication Date
20091007
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Healthcare and Social Assistance
Source Name
BMES 2009: Bridging the 3 Rivers of Biology, Engineering and Medicine. 2009 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), October 7-10, 2009, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
State
WV
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