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The national study to prevent blood exposure in paramedics: rates of exposure to blood.

Authors
Boal-W; Leiss-J; Ratcliffe-J; Sousa-S; Lyden-J; Li-J; Jagger-J
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2010 Feb; 83(2):191-199
NIOSHTIC No.
20036398
Abstract
The purpose of this analysis is to present incidence rates of exposure to blood among paramedics in the United States by selected variables and to compare all percutaneous exposure rates among different types of healthcare workers. A survey on blood exposure was mailed in 2002-2003 to a national sample of paramedics. Results for California paramedics were analyzed with the national sample and also separately. The incidence rate for needlestick/lancet injuries was 100/1,000 employee-years [95% confidence interval (CI), 40-159] among the national sample and 26/1,000 employee-years (95% CI, 15-38) for the California sample. The highest exposure rate was for non-intact skin, 230/1,000 employee-years (95% CI, 130-329). The rate for all exposures was 465/1,000 employee-years (95% CI, 293-637). California needlestick/lancet rates, but not national, were substantially lower than rates in earlier studies of paramedics. Rates for all percutaneous injuries among paramedics were similar to the mid to high range of rates reported for most hospital-based healthcare workers. Paramedics in the United States are experiencing percutaneous injury rates at least as high as, and possibly substantially higher than, most hospital-based healthcare workers, as well as substantially higher rates of exposure to blood on non-intact skin.
Keywords
Bloodborne-pathogens; Emergency-responders; Exposure-levels; Health-care-personnel; Needlestick-injuries; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-health; Paramedical-services; Questionnaires; Risk-factors; Statistical-analysis; Work-environment; Work-operations; Workplace-monitoring; Workplace-studies; Work-practices; Surveillance-programs; Author Keywords: Paramedics; Needlestick; Blood exposure; Survey; Incidence; Occupational health
Contact
Winifred L. Boal, NIOSH, Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluations & Field Studies, Surveillance Branch, 4676 Columbia Parkway, R-17, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
IAEHDW
Publication Date
20100201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
wboal@cdc.gov
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U01-OH-004266
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0340-0131
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
State
OH; VA; CA; NC
Performing Organization
Analytical Sciences, Inc., Durham, North Carolina
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