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Circulating adhesion molecules after short-term exposure to particulate matter among welders.

Authors
Fang-SC; Eisen-EA; Cavallari-JM; Mittleman-MA; Christiani-DC
Source
Occup Environ Med 2010 Jan; 67(1):11-16
NIOSHTIC No.
20036312
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies from several countries indicate that welders experience increased risk of mortality and morbidity from ischaemic heart disease. Although the underlying mechanisms are unclear, vascular responses to particulate matter contained in welding fumes may play a role. To investigate this, we studied the acute effects of welding fume exposure on the endothelial component of vascular function, as measured by circulating adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte adhesion (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1) and coagulation (vWF). METHODS: A panel of 26 male welders was studied repeatedly across a 6 h work-shift on a high exposure welding day and/or a low exposure non-welding day. Personal PM(2.5) exposure was measured throughout the work-shift. Blood samples were collected in the morning (baseline) prior to the exposure period, immediately after the exposure period, and the following morning. To account for the repeated measurements, we used linear mixed models to evaluate the effects of welding (binary) and PM(2.5) (continuous) exposure on each blood marker, adjusting for baseline blood marker concentration, smoking, age and time of day. RESULTS: Welding and PM(2.5) exposure were significantly associated with a decrease in sVCAM-1 in the afternoon and the following morning and an increase in vWF in the afternoon. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that welding and short-term occupational exposure to PM(2.5) may acutely affect the endothelial component of vascular function.
Keywords
Analytical-methods; Blood-sampling; Blood-vessels; Cardiac-function; Cardiovascular-system; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Epidemiology; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Heart-rate; Men; Molecular-biology; Occupational-exposure; Particulates; Physical-stress; Safety-measures; Sampling-methods; Statistical-analysis; Task-performance; Welders; Work-analysis; Work-operations; Work-performance; Workplace-monitoring; Workplace-studies
Contact
Shona Fang, Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, FXB 103, Boston, MA 02115
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20100101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
sfang@hsph.harvard.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1351-0711
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
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