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A decade of childhood agricultural health and safety research.

Authors
Hard-D
Source
Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium: Public Health and the Agricultural-Rural Ecosystem (PHARE), Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, October 19-23, 2008. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada: University of Saskatchewan, 2008 Oct; :1
NIOSHTIC No.
20036193
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of the presentation is to provide an overview of a decade of research supported by the NIOSH Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention Initiative. Methods: NIOSH-funded research grants under the NIOSH Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention Initiative will be reviewed by: I) topic area(s) addressed by grants funded within the request for proposals (RFP), 2) identifying research needs and gaps, and 3) specific research findings of selected individual grants. Results: Thirty-eight Childhood Agricultural Health and Safety research grants have been funded to date, with 32 having been completed. The majority of the grants were targeted toward educational interventions for youth, but the most recently funded grants are more research intervention oriented. Six of the research grants specifically targeted the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT), a resource developed to assist parents in assigning farm jobs to their children 7 - 16 years of age, living or working on farms. The NAGCAT's were developed by the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (NCCRAHS), which is another component of the NIOSH Childhood Agricultural Injury Prevention Initiative. The six research grants targeted toward NAGCAT ranged from evaluating the impact of different dissemination methods of the NAGCAT to farm parents, to comparison studies of injury occurrence on farms which used the NAGCAT to those that didn't. Two research grants addressed agricultural youth surveillance issues and two research grants evaluated the impact of two different national organizational farm safety camps for children. Seven research grants targeted minority populations, primarily Hispanic/migrant youth (and/or their families). This indicates that about 115 of the total research grants which have been awarded to-date targeted minority youth agricultural populations for injury prevention. Application to field practice: This research has direct applications for farm parents and safety and health professionals who work with the priority population of young agricultural workers, children who live on farms and youth who visit farms.
Keywords
Agricultural-workers; Agriculture; Agricultural-industry; Children; Age-groups
Publication Date
20081019
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium: Public Health and the Agricultural-Rural Ecosystem (PHARE), Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, October 19-23, 2008.
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