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A compromise circadian phase position for permanent night work improves mood, fatigue, and performance.

Authors
Smith-MR; Fogg-LF; Eastman-CI
Source
Sleep 2009 Nov; 32(11):1481-1489
NIOSHTIC No.
20036149
Abstract
Study Objective: To assess night shift improvements in mood, fatigue, and performance when the misalignment between circadian rhythms and a night shift, day sleep schedule is reduced. Design: Blocks of simulated night shifts alternated with days off. Experimental subjects had interventions to delay their circadian clocks to partially align with a night shift schedule. Control subjects had no interventions. Subjects were categorized according to the degree of circadian realignment independent of whether they were in the experimental or control groups. Twelve subjects were categorized as not re-entrained, 21 as partially re-entrained, and 6 as completely re-entrained. Setting: Home sleep and laboratory night shifts. Participants: Young healthy adults. Interventions: Experimental subjects had intermittent bright light pulses during night shifts, wore dark sunglasses outside, and had scheduled sleep episodes in darkness. Measurements and Results: A computerized test battery was administered every 2 hours during day and night shifts. After about one week on the night shift schedule, which included a weekend off, the partially and completely re-entrained groups had markedly improved mood, fatigue, and performance compared to the group that was not re-entrained. The completely and partially re-entrained groups were similar to each other and had levels of mood, fatigue, and performance that were close to daytime levels. Conclusions: Partial re-entrainment to a permanent night shift schedule, which can be produced by feasible, inexpensive interventions, is associated with greatly reduced impairments during night shifts.
Keywords
Circadian-rhythms; Laboratory-testing; Light-properties Neurophysiological-effects; Shift-work; Shift-workers; Sleep-deprivation; Sleep-disorders; Training; Work-environment; Work-intervals; Author Keywords: Shift work; performance; alertness; mood; human; circadian rhythms; bright light; melatonin
Contact
Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Department of Behavioral Science, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612
CODEN
SLEED6
Publication Date
20091101
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
846000
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003954
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0161-8105
Priority Area
Work Environment and Workforce: Organization of Work
Source Name
Sleep
State
IL
Performing Organization
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
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