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Active cigarette smoking, secondhand smoke exposure at work and home, and self-rated health.

Authors
Nakata-A; Takahashi-M; Swanson-NG; Ikeda-T; Hojou-M
Source
Public Health 2009 Oct; 123(10):650-656
NIOSHTIC No.
20036080
Abstract
Objectives: Although active smoking has been reported to be associated with poor self-rated health (SRH), its association with secondhand smoke (SHS) is not well understood. Study design: A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the association of active smoking and SHS exposure with SRH. Methods: A total of 2558 workers (1899 men and 689 women), aged 16-83 (mean 45) years, in 296 small and medium-sized enterprises were surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Smoking status and exposure levels to SHS (no, occasional or regular) among lifetime non-smokers were assessed separately at work and at home. SRH was assessed with the question: How would you describe your health during the past 1-year period (very poor, poor, good, very good)? SRH was dichotomized into suboptimal (poor, very poor) and optimal (good, very good). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for reporting suboptimal vs optimal SRH according to smoking status and smoke exposure were calculated. Results: Current heavy smokers (20+ cigarettes/day) had a significantly increased suboptimal SRH than lifetime non-smokers after adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle, physical and occupational factors (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.06-1.69). Similarly, lifetime non-smokers occasionally exposed to SHS at work alone had worse SRH than their unexposed counterparts (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02-2.11). In contrast, lifetime non-smokers exposed at home alone had no significant increase in suboptimal SRH. Conclusions: The present study indicates an increase in suboptimal SRH among current heavy smokers, and suggests that SHS exposure at work is a possible risk factor for non-smokers. Whether or not the association is causal, control of smoking at work may protect workers from developing future health conditions.
Keywords
Cigarette-smoking; Tobacco-smoke; Small-businesses; Questionnaires; Statistical-analysis; Demographic-characteristics
Contact
A. Nakata, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
CODEN
PUHEAE
Publication Date
20091001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
cji5@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
0033-3506
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Services
Source Name
Public Health
State
OH
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