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Interpreting longitudinal spirometry: weight gain and other factors affecting the recognition of excessive FEV1 decline.

Authors
Wang-ML; Avashia-BH; Petsonk-EL
Source
Am J Ind Med 2009 Oct; 52(10):782-789
NIOSHTIC No.
20035979
Abstract
Background: Excessive FEV1 loss in an individual or a group can reflect hazardous exposures and development of lung disease. However, multiple factors may affect FEV1 measurements. Methods: Using medical screening data collected in 1884 chemical plant workers between 1973 and 2003, the influence of multiple factors on repeated measurements of FEV1 was examined. Results: The FEV1 level was associated with age, height, race, sex, cigarette smoking, changes in body weight, and spirometer model. After controlling for these factors, longitudinal FEV1 decline averaged 23.8 ml/year for white males; an additional loss of 8.3 ml was associated with one pack-year smoking and 5.4 ml with a one pound weight gain. Depending on the spirometer model, FEV1 differed by up to 95 ml. Conclusions: The study results provide quantitative estimates of the effect of specific factors on FEV1, and should be useful to health professionals in the evaluation of accelerated lung function declines.
Keywords
Chemical-factory-workers; Chemical-hypersensitivity; Chemical-industry-workers; Chemical-manufacturing-industry; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Exposure-methods; Health-hazards; Health-surveys; Inhalation-studies; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-health; Occupational-respiratory-disease; Pulmonary-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Quantitative-analysis; Respiratory-function-tests; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-infections; Respiratory-irritants; Respiratory-system-disorders; Statistical-analysis; Work-analysis; Work-environment; Worker-health; Workplace-studies; Surveillance; Author Keywords: mass screening; excessive FEV1 decline; spirometry; mixed model; longitudinal data
Contact
Edward L. Petsonk, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mail Stop H-G900-2,1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20091001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
elp2@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
WV
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