Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Social support for smoking cessation and abstinence - the lung health study.

Authors
Murray-RP; Johnston-JJ; Dolce-JJ; Lee-WW; Ohara-P
Source
Addict Behav 1995 Mar-Apr; 20(2):159-170
NIOSHTIC No.
20035871
Abstract
This article evaluates the relationship of social support to smoking cessation and continued abstinence of 3923 men and women with mild to moderate airway obstruction in the Lung Health Study. At both the end of a 12-week group program and after 1 year, men but not women who were supported in quitting were more likely to be successful. Married status facilitated quitting but was less strongly related to long-term abstinence. Participants supported by an ex-smoker who had attended the group program with them were very likely not smoking after 1 year (men, 74.7%; women, 72.4%). Participants supported by a smoker were less than half as likely to have achieved abstinence after 1 year but still had cessation rates greater than 30%. The nature of these relationships has implications for the distinction between women and men in studies of social support and for intervention strategies. Support people should be included in cessation intervention programs. Spouse involvement, however, is more evidently useful for men than for women.
Keywords
Biological-effects; Biological-systems; Lung; Lung-irritants; Pulmonary-system; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-irritants; Smoking; Sociological-factors; Statistical-analysis
Contact
Robert P. Murray, Department of Internal Medicine, MS-754, Health Sciences Centre, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A IR9
CODEN
ADBEDS
Publication Date
19950309
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0306-4603
NIOSH Division
DSR
Source Name
Addictive Behaviors
State
WV
TOP