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Trail mountain mine: a case study for improving locations of mining-induced seismicity with double-difference relocation.

Authors
Sonley-E; Pankow-KL; McCarter-MK
Source
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining, July 28-30, 2009, Morgantown, West Virginia. Peng SS, Barczak T, Mark C, Tadolini S, Finfinger G, Heasley K, Luo Y, eds., Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University, 2009 Jul; :187-194
NIOSHTIC No.
20035840
Abstract
In October 2000, temporary seismographic stations were installed above the Trail Mountain Mine, Emery County, Utah, USA to supplement a regional network. Over seven months, 1826 mining-induced seismic events were recorded with a magnitude range of M 0 to M 2.2 (Arabasz et al., 2002, 2005). Routine event locations for this dataset cluster around the longwall mining activity during the recording interval. However, applying a double difference relocation technique to the routine locations significantly improves the correlation between mining activity and event location. The resulting relocations depend greatly on station distribution and the number of arrival time picks. We use this dense temporary array to assess station distribution requirements for applying the double difference technique at other mines by systematically removing data from available stations, thus simulating sparser networks. The insight gained using the Trail Mountain dataset is used to develop a metric for assessing the usefulness of above-mine networks and to develop a tool for expanding seismic network coverage. To verify the appropriateness of these tools for wider application, we examine data from two additional mines located in the western United States. Improving the relative locations of mining-induced seismic events highlights the association of these events with active portions of the mine. Clusters, regions of quiescence and relative timing of events can be used by mine operators to assess hazard, optimize production, and evaluate performance of mine plans. The lessons learned from this study may be used in future network design to improve accuracy of event locations at other mines.
Keywords
Case-studies; Ground-control; Ground-stability; Mine-shafts; Stone-mines; Mining-industry; Room-and-pillar-mining; Underground-mining; Work-environment
Publication Date
20090728
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Peng-SS; Barczak-T; Mark-C; Tadolini-S; Finfinger-G; Heasley-K; Luo-Y
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780978938338
Identifying No.
Contract-200-2008-25438
NIOSH Division
SRL
Priority Area
Mining
Source Name
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining, July 28-30, 2009, Morgantown, West Virginia
State
WA; WV; UT
Performing Organization
University of Utah
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