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Carpenters employed in US construction or wood products industries proportionate mortality 1987-1990.

Authors
Robinson-CF; Palu-S
Source
Am J Epidemiol 1995 Jun; 141(11)(Suppl):S30
NIOSHTIC No.
20035615
Abstract
The study was conducted to evaluate the mortality of 27,362 members who died 1987-1990 of the U.S. Carpenters' Union for preventable causes associated with occupational exposures in the construction or wood products industries. Age- adjusted proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) and proportionate cancer mortality ratios (PCMRs) were computed using the U.S. age, gender and race specific death rates for comparison. For carpenters who were last employed while in construction industry locals, raised mortality was restricted to lung cancer (PCMR=1O7, N=2327, CI=1O3,1l1), bone cancer (PCMR=181, N=18, CI=1O7,286), lymphatic cancer (PCMR=1l2, N=326, CI=101,125), emphysema (PMR=ll5, N=274, CI=1O2,130), transportation injuries (PMR=121, N=330, CI=1O9,135), and falls (PMR=122, N=158, CI= I 04, 142). For carpenters who were last employed while in industrial wood products locals, significantly raised mortality was confined to stomach cancer (PCMR=187, N=44, CI=136,250), male breast cancer (PCMR=469, N=4, CI=128,nO), and transportation injuries (PMR=136, N=65, CI=1l0,173). Excess breast cancer was associated with last employment in wood machining trades. Nasal cancer mortality was not elevated, due to its high survival rate. 24 pleural mesotheliomas were observed among carpenters last employed in construction locals. Multiple cause of death analyses revealed raised mortality for these and additional causes. 4594 of 27,362 (18%) death certificates mentioned pneumoconioses as a contributing factor. Limitations prevent drawing firm conclusions, but raised mortality from lung and lymphatic cancer, mesothelioma, and injuries among U.S. construction carpenters confirm known hazards of construction.
Keywords
Age-factors; Biological-effects; Biological-monitoring; Cancer-rates; Construction; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Epidemiology; Exposure-assessment; Lung-disease; Lymphatic-system-disorders; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Mortality-surveys; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-health; Racial-factors; Risk-factors; Sex-factors; Statistical-analysis; Traumatic-injuries; Wood; Wood-products; Woodworkers; Woodworking-industry; Work-analysis; Work-environment; Worker-health; Workplace-studies; Work-practices
Contact
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, DSHEFS, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
AJEPAS
Publication Date
19950601
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0002-9262
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Journal of Epidemiology. Abstracts of the 28th Annual Meeting of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, Snowbird, Utah, June 21-24, 1995
State
OH
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