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The limits of testing particle-mediated oxidative stress in vitro in predicting diverse pathologies; relevance for testing of nanoparticles.

Authors
Donaldson-K; Borm-PJA; Castranova-V; Gulumian-M
Source
Part Fibre Toxicol 2009 Apr; 6:13
NIOSHTIC No.
20035501
Abstract
In vitro studies with particles are a major staple of particle toxicology, generally used to investigate mechanisms and better understand the molecular events underlying cellular effects. However, there is ethical and financial pressure in nanotoxicology, the new sub-specialty of particle toxicology, to avoid using animals. Therefore an increasing amount of studies are being published using in vitro approaches and such studies require careful interpretation. We point out here that 3 different conventional pathogenic particle types, PM10, asbestos and quartz, which cause diverse pathological effects, have been reported to cause very similar oxidative stress effects in cells in culture. We discuss the likely explanation and implications of this apparent paradox, and its relevance for testing in nanotoxicology.
Keywords
Aerosol-particles; Animals; Biohazards; Biological-effects; Cell-function; Cell-morphology; Cellular-function; Cellular-reactions; Microbiology; Microscopic-analysis; Molecular-biology; Oxidative-processes; Particulate-dust; Particulates; Particulate-sampling-methods; Respirable-dust; Toxic-effects; Toxic-materials; Toxicopathology; Nanotechnology
Contact
Ken Donaldson, MRC/University of Edinburgh Centre for Inflammation Research, ELEGI Colt Laboratory, Queen's Medical Research Institute, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ, UK
Publication Date
20090427
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ken.donaldson@ed.ac.uk
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
1743-8977
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Particle and Fibre Toxicology
State
WV
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