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Sleep, health, and work outcomes for shift workers: results from the 2008 sleep in America poll.

Authors
Swanson-L; Arnedt-J; Rosa-R; Rosekind-M; Belenky-G; Balkin-T; Drake-C
Source
Sleep 2009 Jun; 32(Abstract Suppl):A58-A59
NIOSHTIC No.
20035426
Abstract
Introduction: Of the 15% of U.S. workers employed in shift work (SW), 10% report symptoms of shift work sleep disorder (SWSD). Using results from the National Sleep Foundation's 2008 "Sleep in America" poll, we assessed differences on sleep-, health-, and work-related outcomes among SW, SWSD, and day workers (DW). Methods: Data were obtained from the NSF's 2008 "Sleep in America" poll, which evaluated sleep-, health-, and work-related outcomes in a nationally-representative sample of 1000 U.S. workers. Participants reporting work start times between 1800 and 0600 hours were classified as SW. SW who reported symptoms of insomnia or excessive daytime sleepiness (ICSD-2 diagnostic criteria) were considered at-risk for SWSD. Chi-square tests and logistic regressions (adjusted for age, gender, and BMI) were used to evaluate group differences. Results: Seven percent of participants were classified as SW, and 21 % of SW were at-risk for SWSD. Compared to DW, a larger percentage of SW reported sleeping less than 6 hours per night over the past two weeks (33% vs 15%, p=.001) and impairment due to sleepiness (21% vs 13%, p=.001). Odds of a work accident over the past year were 3x higher for SW (95% CI=1.27-6) and 4x higher for SWSD (CI=1.15-16.48) compared to DW. As compared to DW, the odds of drowsy driving at least once per month were 2x higher for SW (CI=1.28-3.61) and 4x higher for SWSD (CI=1.43-15.37). Relative to DW, SWSD participants were more likely to report current treatment for heart disease (p=.005), diabetes (p=.013), and GERD (p=.005). Relative to SW, SWSD participants were 26x more likely to report treatment of diabetes. Conclusion: In this nationally representative sample of U.S. workers, SW reported sleeping less and more impairment due to sleepiness than DW, as well as an increased risk for work accidents and drowsy driving. SWSD was associated with several chronic health conditions.
Keywords
Sleep-disorders; Sleep-deprivation; Education; Fatigue; Fatigue-properties; Humans; Public-health; Statistical-analysis; Demographic-characteristics; Epidemiology
CODEN
SLEED6
Publication Date
20090601
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
0161-8105
NIOSH Division
OD
Source Name
Sleep
State
DC; MD; MI; CA; WA
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