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Injury severity related to overturn characteristics of tractors.

Authors
Myers-ML; Cole-HP; Westneat-SC
Source
J Saf Res 2009 Apr; 40(2):165-170
NIOSHTIC No.
20035412
Abstract
Introduction: Early studies of injuries associated with overturns indicate that more fatalities occurred when a tractor overturned beyond 90 degrees (continuous roll) relative to the impact plane. Recently, the principle of preventing continuous rolls has re-emerged for the protection of riding lawnmower operators. Method: Related to tractors, a population-based study was conducted that compared the severity of fatal and nonfatal injuries between a 90 degrees and continuous roll for tractors equipped with rollover protective structures (ROPS) and not equipped with a ROPS (non- ROPS). In 2002, the Kentucky Farm Tractor Overturn Survey was administered to an 8% random sample (6,063) of Kentucky farm operators. The farmers responded to questions that differentiated between the types of overturns and operator injury outcomes for ROPS-equipped and non-ROPS tractors during overturn events. Overturn characteristics were collected that included 90 degrees to the side, beyond 90 degrees to the side, and to the rear for both ROPS-equipped and non-ROPS tractors. RESULTS: Of the 541 overturns reported in this study, 535 (99%) of the respondents reported the most recent overturn characteristics of the tractor: 92 (17%) were ROPS-equipped and 443 (83%) were non-ROPS. For side overturns, 67% of the rolls occurred with ROPS-equipped tractors, and 54% occurred with non-ROPS tractors. The percentages of deaths related to rolls to the side for ROPS-equipped and non-ROPS tractors were, respectively, 1.6% and 3.7%. There was one (2%) deaths related to 90 degrees rolls for ROPS-equipped tractors, whereas for continuous rolls there were 6.4% fatalities related to side overturns, 13% resulted in non-fatal injuries with an average of 1 day of hospitalization for ROPS-equipped tractors, and 39% resulted in non-fatal injuries with an average of 18 days of hospitalization for non-ROPS tractors. The results from this study indicated that a ROPS was more effective at stopping an overturn at 90 degrees than no ROPS, with an associated reduction in the severity of injury in the event of a tractor overturn.
Keywords
Agricultural-industry; Agricultural-machinery; Agricultural-processes; Agricultural-workers; Agriculture; Education; Equipment-operators; Equipment-reliability; Farmers; Health-hazards; Health-protection; Health-standards; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Personal-protective-equipment; Protective-equipment; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Safety-measures; Safety practice; Safety-education; Safety-engineering; Safety-equipment; Safety-measures; Safety-monitoring; Safety-practices; Safety-programs; Statistical-analysis; Work-analysis; Work-operations; Work-practices; Worker-health; Worker-motivation; Author Keywords: tractor; overturn; rollover; rollover protective structures; ROPS; injuries; fatalities; seatbelts
Contact
Melvin L. Myers, University of Kentucky, College of Public Health, Lexington, KY 40536
CODEN
JSFRAV
Publication Date
20090401
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
245243
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Agriculture
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U50-OH-007547; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U06-CCU-412900
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0022-4375
Priority Area
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing
Source Name
Journal of Safety Research
State
KY
Performing Organization
University of Kentucky
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