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Neuromuscular control of lumbar instability following static work of various loads.

Authors
Le-B; Davidson-B; Solomonow-D; Zhou-BH; Lu-Y; Patel-V; Solomonow-M
Source
Muscle Nerve 2009 Jan; 39(1):71-82
NIOSHTIC No.
20035131
Abstract
Neuromuscular control of lumbar stability following exposure to prolonged static work, under low and high loads, was assessed in the in vivo feline model. Six sessions of 10 min work at 20N with 10 min between rest was compared to a group subjected to the same protocol but carrying high loads of 60N. Displacement and tension developed in the spine at the instant the multifidus muscles applied stabilizing contractions, and their amplitudes were obtained from their electromyogram (EMG). Significant (P < 0.001) laxity developed in the various viscoelastic tissues of the lumbar spine that did not recover during and up to 7 h of rest postwork. Simultaneously, there was a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in muscular activity in the 3-4 h immediately postwork under low load but only during the first hour in the high load group. After that period the musculature compensated for the laxity of the viscoelastic tissues by a significant (P < 0.001) increase in activity in the high-load group and a nonsignificant increase in the low group. It was concluded that during 1-3 h immediately poststatic work a significant decrease in the stabilizing function of viscoelastic tissues together with a significant decrease in muscular activity is present, and they render the spine unstable and exposed to high risk of injury. Performance of prolonged static work under low loads, while not harmful during the work, cannot be designated as a "no-risk" condition, as it may result in injury postwork.
Keywords
Animal-studies; Back-injuries; Biomechanics; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Laboratory-animals; Laboratory-testing; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Neuromuscular-system-disorders; Physiological-factors; Physiological-measurements; Physiological-response; Physiological-effects; Physiological-fatigue; Risk-factors; Rest-periods; Author Keywords: spine; lumbar; stability; muscles; multifidus; EMG
Contact
Moshe Solomonow, Musculoskeletal Disorders Research Laboratory, Bioengineering Division, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Health Sciences Center, 12800 E. 19th Avenue, RC-1 N, Mail Stop 8343, PO Box 6511, Denver, Colorado 80045
CODEN
MUNEDE
Publication Date
20090101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
moshe.solomonow@ucdenver.edu
Funding Amount
695194
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007622
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0148-639X
Source Name
Muscle & Nerve
State
LA; CO
Performing Organization
Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
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