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The effects of a phytogenic feed additive versus an antibiotic feed additive on oxidative stress in broiler chicks and electron spin resonance.

Authors
Settle-T; Moritz-J; Leonard-S; Falkenstein-E; Klandorf-H
Source
Poul Sci 2008 Jul ; 87(Suppl 1):116
NIOSHTIC No.
20035069
Abstract
Phytogenic feed additives are plant-derived products used in poultry feeding to improve overall performance of broilers. Although the precise mechanism by which the increased growth rate is realized remains uncertain, these products have antioxidant components that are known to reduce oxidative stress. In this study, 588 one-day-old Cobb 500 chicks of mixed sex were fed 1 of 4 diets and housed on either dirty or clean litter for 3 wk. Litter was analyzed for microbial content and provided evidence of a possible microbial challenge. Treatments included starter diet with no additive and housed on clean litter, a starter diet with no additive and housed on dirty litter, a starter diet with a 0.05% inclusion of BMD (bacitracin methylene disalicylate), or a starter diet with a 0.05% inclusion of Biostrong 505 plus¢ē. The study was designed around a random block assignment of treatments allocated to groups of 21 birds per pen. Blood samples were obtained from chicks at 18 days of age for measurement of leukocyte oxidative activity by a bioluminescence technique. Results of the study showed that chicks in the treatment groups fed either the phytogenic additive or the antibiotic had lower levels of oxidative stress (P < or equal to 0.05). Analysis the Biostrong 505 plus(copyright) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) showed that it effectively scavenged hydroxyl radicals but not superoxide radicals. The BMD showed the capability of scavenging both hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. These studies suggest that one of the mechanisms by which phytogenic feed additives act in the gut is by quenching free radical production, thus permitting more nutrients to be allocated toward growth instead of repair.
Keywords
Antibiotics; Agricultural-industry; Age-groups; Animal-husbandry; Animal-studies; Environmental-exposure; Feeding-study; Growth-factors; Growth-rate; Nutrition; Organic-chemicals; Organic-compounds; Oxidation-reduction-reactions; Author Keywords: Oxidative stress; Phytogenic additive; Electron spin resonance
CODEN
POSCAL
Publication Date
20080720
Document Type
Abstract; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
0032-5791
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Poultry Science: Poultry Science Association 97th Annual Meeting July 20-23, 2008 Niagara Falls, Canada Poster Session
State
WV
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