Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Occupational exposures and asthma in health-care workers: comparison of self-reports with a workplace-specific job exposure matrix.

Authors
Delclos-GL; Gimeno-D; Arif-AA; Benavides-FG; Zock-JP
Source
Am J Epidemiol 2009 Mar; 169(5):581-587
NIOSHTIC No.
20035067
Abstract
The authors compared self-reported occupational exposures with a workplace-specific job exposure matrix (JEM) in a 2004 survey of Texas health-care professionals (n = 3,650), by asthma status. Sensitivity, specificity, chance-corrected (kappa) and chance-independent (phi) agreement, and associations of self-reported exposures with asthma were compared with those for the JEM. Among asthmatics, the median sensitivity of self-reported exposures was 74% (range, 53-90); specificity was 64% (range, 27-74). For nonasthmatics, median sensitivity was 67% (range, 40-88) and specificity was 70% (range, 33-82). Sensitivity was higher among asthmatics for exposures involving perceptible odors. Specificity was higher among nonasthmatics for instrument cleaning and exposure to adhesives/solvents. Asthmatics showed better agreement with the JEM for patient-care-related cleaning (phi = 0.51 vs. 0.40); there was little difference for other exposures. In all cases, confidence intervals overlapped. Prevalence ratios were higher with self-reported exposures than with the JEM; differences were greatest for cleaning products, adhesives/solvents, and gases/vapors. However, confidence intervals overlapped with those obtained using the JEM. In asthma studies, differential reporting bias by health status should be taken into consideration. Findings favor using externally developed methods of exposure classification, although information gleaned from examining distributions of exposure self-reports, particularly among nondiseased persons, can provide useful information for improving the reliability of exposure ascertainment.
Keywords
Allergies; Bronchial-asthma; Epidemiology; Exposure-assessment; Chemical-cleaning; Chemical-hypersensitivity; Cleaning-compounds; Health-care-personnel; Occupational-exposure; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Questionnaires; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-irritants; Solvents; Author Keywords: Asthma; Bias (epidemiology); Epidemiologic methods; Occupational exposure
Contact
Dr. George L. Delclos, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, P.O. Box 20186, Houston, TX 77225-0186
CODEN
AJEPAS
Publication Date
20090301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
george.delclos@uth.tmc.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003945
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0002-9262
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Source Name
American Journal of Epidemiology
State
TX
Performing Organization
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
TOP