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Community-based intervention to reduce pesticide exposure to farmworkers and potential take-home exposure to their families.

Authors
Bradman-A; Salvatore-AL; Boeniger-M; Castorina-R; Snyder-J; Barr-DB; Jewell-NP; Kavanagh-Baird-G; Striley-C; Eskenazi-B
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 2009 Jan; 19(1):79-89
NIOSHTIC No.
20034874
Abstract
The US EPA Worker Protection Standard requires pesticide safety training for farmworkers. Combined with re-entry intervals, these regulations are designed to reduce pesticide exposure. Little research has been conducted on whether additional steps may reduce farmworker exposure and the potential for take-home exposure to their families. We conducted an intervention with 44 strawberry harvesters (15 control and 29 intervention group members) to determine whether education, encouragement of handwashing, and the use of gloves and removable coveralls reduced exposure. Post-intervention, we collected foliage and urine samples, as well as hand rinse, lower-leg skin patch, and clothing patch samples. Post-intervention loading of malathion on hands was lower among workers who wore gloves compared to those who did not (median = 8.2 vs. 777.2 mu g per pair, respectively (P < 0.001)); similarly, median MDA levels in urine were lower among workers who wore gloves (45.3 vs. 131.2 mu g/g creatinine, P < 0.05). Malathion was detected on clothing (median 0.13 mu g/cm(2)), but not on skin. Workers who ate strawberries had higher malathion dicarboxylic acid levels in urine (median = 114.5 vs. 39.4 mu g/g creatinine, P < 0.01). These findings suggest that wearing gloves reduces pesticide exposure to workers contacting strawberry foliage containing dislodgeable residues. Additionally, wearing gloves and removing work clothes before returning home could reduce transport of pesticides to worker homes. Behavioral interventions are needed to reduce consumption of strawberries in the field.
Keywords
Biological-factors; Biological-systems; Health-hazards; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-safety-programs; Risk-factors; Personal-protection; Pesticide-residues; Pesticides; Pesticides-and-agricultural-chemicals; Behavior-patterns; Statistical-analysis
Contact
Dr. Asa Bradman, Center for Children's Environmental Health Research, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 600, Berkeley, CA 94720-7380
CODEN
JEAEE9
Publication Date
20090101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
abradman@socrates.berkeley.edu
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
1559-0631
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Manufacturing; Construction
Source Name
Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
State
OH; CA; KY; GA
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