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Pneumoconiosis mortality and morbidity trends in the United States, 1968-2004.

Authors
Attfield-MD; Bang-KM; Petsonk-EL; Mazurek-JM
Source
Proceedings of XVIIIth World Congress on Safety and Health at Work, June 29, 2008 - July 2, 2008, Seoul, Korea. Seoul, Korea: Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency, 2008 Jun; :1-5
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20034849
Abstract
Objective: To describe trends in pneumoconiosis in the United States during 1968-2004. Methods: The National Center for Health Statistics multiple cause-of-death records were used to derive numbers of deaths and death rates for asbestosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), and silicosis. Morbidity data on CWP from a large national worker monitoring program were used to derive CWP prevalence defined as presence on the chest radiograph of small opacities category 1/0 or greater or large opacities, as determined by at least two National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) readers. Results: Overall, annual asbestosis deaths increased over 19-fold from 78 in 1968 to 1,493 in 2000 and then declined to 1,470 in 2004, due mostly to a drop in asbestosis deaths among those aged < / = 74; deaths continue to increase among individuals aged > / =75. Silicosis deaths decreased nearly 6-fold from 1,065 in 1968 to 178 in 1998; no substantial change was observed thereafter in all age groups (mean 166 deaths/year for 1999-2004 overall, with a mean of 4 deaths/year among individuals aged 15-44 years). CWP deaths peaked in 1972 (n=2,910), and then declined more than 4-fold to 703 in 2004. After 1998, the number of CWP deaths continued to decline among those aged >/= 65, but appeared to increase among younger individuals (15-44 years old). CWP prevalence in working coal miners with 20 years of tenure increased nearly 3-fold from 3.2% in 1995-1999 to 8.3% in 2005-2006. Conclusions: The slight decline from 2000 through 2004 in asbestosis deaths suggests that asbestosis mortality has peaked in the U.S. Mortality data for silicosis indicate a continuing occupational risk, even in younger workers. The increase in both CWP mortality and CWP morbidity suggests that past gains in disease prevention are being compromised.
Keywords
Asbestos-workers; Silica-dusts; Silicate-miners; Silicates; Silicon-compounds; Asbestos-dust; Asbestos-fibers; Asbestos-industry; Asbestos-mining; Morbidity-rates; Mortality-rates; Mortality-surveys; Statistical-analysis; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Occupational-health; Work-environment; Work-practices; Worker-health; Workplace-studies; Surveillance
CAS No.
1332-21-4; 7440-21-3
Publication Date
20080629
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Funding Type
Construction
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
Proceedings of XVIIIth World Congress on Safety and Health at Work, June 29, 2008 - July 2, 2008, Seoul, Korea
State
WV
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