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What aspects of shiftwork influence off-shift well-being of healthcare workers?

Authors
Barnes-Farrell-JL; Davies-Schrils-K; McGonagle-A; Walsh-B; Milia-LD; Fischer-FM; Hobbs-BB; Kaliterna-L; Tepas-D
Source
Appl Ergon 2008 Sep; 39(5):589-596
NIOSHTIC No.
20034687
Abstract
Characteristics of shiftwork schedules have implications for off-shift well-being. We examined the extent to which several shift characteristics (e.g., shift length, working sundays) are associated with three aspects of off-shift well-being: work-to-family conflict, physical well-being, and mental well-being. We also investigated whether these relationships differed in four nations. The Survey of Work and Time was completed by 906 healthcare professionals located in Australia, Brazil, Croatia, and the USA. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses supported the hypothesis that shiftwork characteristics account for significant unique variance in all three measures of well-being beyond that accounted for by work and family demands and personal characteristics. The patterns of regression weights indicated that particular shiftwork characteristics have differential relevance to indices of work-to-family conflict, physical well-being, and mental well-being. Our findings suggest that healthcare organizations should carefully consider the implications of shiftwork characteristics for off-shift well-being. Furthermore, although our findings did not indicate national differences in the nature of relationships between shift characteristics and well-being, shiftwork characteristics and demographics for healthcare professionals differ in systematic ways among nations; as such, effective solutions may be context-specific.
Keywords
Shift-work; Shift-workers; Health-care-personnel; Health-surveys; Health-standards; Psychological-adaptation; Psychological-responses; Statistical-analysis; Sociological-factors
Contact
Janet L. Barnes-Farrell, Department of Psychology, Unit 1020, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-1020
CODEN
AERGBW
Publication Date
20080901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
Janet.Barnes-Farrell@uconn.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T01-OH-008610
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0003-6870
Source Name
Applied Ergonomics
State
CT; SD
Performing Organization
University of Connecticut - Storrs-Mansfield
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