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Pulmonary inflammation and tumor induction in lung tumor susceptible A/J and resistant C57BL/6J mice exposed to welding fume.

Authors
Zeidler-Erdely-PC; Kashon-ML; Battelli-LA; Young-SH; Erdely-A; Roberts-JR; Reynolds-SH; Antonini-JM
Source
Part Fibre Toxicol 2008 Sep; 5:12
NIOSHTIC No.
20034568
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Welding fume has been categorized as "possibly carcinogenic" to humans. Our objectives were to characterize the lung response to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic metal-containing welding fumes and to determine if these fumes caused increased lung tumorigenicity in A/J mice, a lung tumor susceptible strain. We exposed male A/J and C57BL/6J, a lung tumor resistant strain, by pharyngeal aspiration four times (once every 3 days) to 85 mug of gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS), GMA-stainless steel (SS), or manual metal arc-SS (MMA-SS) fume, or to 25.5 mug soluble hexavalent chromium (S-Cr). Shams were exposed to saline vehicle. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was done at 2, 7, and 28 days post-exposure. For the lung tumor study, gross tumor counts and histopathological changes were assessed in A/J mice at 48 and 78 weeks post-exposure. RESULTS: BAL revealed notable strain-dependent differences with regards to the degree and resolution of the inflammatory response after exposure to the fumes. At 48 weeks, carcinogenic metal-containing GMA-SS fume caused the greatest increase in tumor multiplicity and incidence, but this was not different from sham. By 78 weeks, tumor incidence in the GMA-SS group versus sham approached significance (p = 0.057). A significant increase in perivascular/peribronchial lymphoid infiltrates for the GMA-SS group versus sham and an increased persistence of this fume in lung cells compared to the other welding fumes was found. CONCLUSION: The increased persistence of GMA-SS fume in combination with its metal composition may trigger a chronic, but mild, inflammatory state in the lung possibly enhancing tumorigenesis in this susceptible mouse strain.
Keywords
Welding; Fumes; Carcinogens; Metal-fumes; Animal-studies; Animals; Laboratory-animals
Contact
Patti C Zeidler-Erdely, Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, USA
Publication Date
20080908
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
paz9@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
1743-8977
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Construction; Manufacturing
Source Name
Particle and Fibre Toxicology
State
WV
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