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Adiposity measures and oxidative stress among police officers.

Authors
Charles-LE; Burchfiel-CM; Violanti-JM; Fekedulegn-D; Slaven-JE; Browne-RW; Hartley-TA; Andrew-ME
Source
Obesity 2008 Nov; 16(11):2489-2497
NIOSHTIC No.
20034431
Abstract
Our objective was to investigate associations between adiposity measures (BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio, and abdominal height) and biomarkers of oxidative stress (glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), vitamin C, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC)) among police officers. This cross-sectional study included randomly selected police officers (43 policewomen; 67 policemen) from Buffalo, New York. Adiposity measures were performed using standardized methods. Biomarkers were measured on fasting blood specimens. An oxidative stress score (OSS) was created as a composite of the biomarkers. ANOVAs were used to compare mean levels of biomarkers across tertiles of the adiposity measures. Officers were 26- to 61-years old. GSH was inversely associated with waist circumference (trend P = 0.030) and waist-to-hip ratio (trend P = 0.026). GSH-Px was inversely associated with BMI (trend P = 0.004) and with waist-to-height ratio (trend P = 0.017). No associations were observed for TEAC, TBARS, or OSS with any adiposity measure. Significant interactions were observed by physical activity status for GSH with waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio and for vitamin C with waist circumference, waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratios. The above associations were inversely related only among officers who reported engaging in physical activity. Inverse associations were observed for BMI and waist circumference with GSH, but only among women; the interaction with gender was significant. Larger indices of adiposity were associated with increased levels of oxidative stress and decreased levels of antioxidant defense.
Keywords
Weight-factors; Weight-measurement; Police-officers; Sex-factors; Statistical-analysis; Mathematical-models; Women; Physical-fitness; Stress; Oxidative-metabolism
Contact
Luenda E. Charles, CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, HELD/BEB, MS L-4050, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505-2888
CODEN
OBREFR
Publication Date
20081101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
lcharles@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1930-7381
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Services; Services: Public Safety
Source Name
Obesity
State
WV
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