Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Occupational segregation as a determinant of US worker health.

Authors
Chung-Bridges-K; Muntaner-C; Fleming-LE; Lee-DJ; Arheart-KL; LeBlanc-WG; Christ-SL; McCollister-KE; Caban-AJ; Davila-EP
Source
Am J Ind Med 2008 Aug; 51(8):555-567
NIOSHTIC No.
20034380
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Racial segregation provides a potential mechanism to link occupations with adverse health outcomes. METHODS: An African-American segregation index (I(AA)) was calculated for US worker groups from the nationally representative pooled 1986-1994 National Health Interview Survey (n = 451,897). Ranking and logistic regression analyses were utilized to document associations between I(AA) and poor worker health. RESULTS: There were consistent positive associations between employment in segregated occupations and poor worker health, regardless of covariate adjustment or stratification (e.g., age, gender, income, education, or geographic region). This association between segregation and poor health was stronger for White as compared to African-American workers. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational segregation negatively affects all workers. Potential mechanisms need to be identified through which occupational segregation may adversely impact worker health.
Keywords
Occupational-health; Occupational-health-programs; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Work-environment; Work-performance; Work-practices; Worker-health; Workplace-studies; Age-factors; Education; Statistical-analysis
Contact
Lora E. Fleming, Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, 1120 N.W. 14 Street, Room 1049, Miami, FL 33136
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20080801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
lfleming@med.miami.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-009010; Grant-Number-R01-OH-003915
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
FL; MD; NC
Performing Organization
University of Miami - Rosentiel School
TOP