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Crane-related deaths in construction and recommendations for their prevention.

Authors
McCann-M; Gittleman-J; Watters-M
Source
Silver Spring, MD: CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, 2008 Jun; :1-8
NIOSHTIC No.
20034107
Abstract
The deaths of six construction workers and a bystander, along with injuries to 24 construction workers and first responders in a New York City crane collapse March 15, 2008, set off an alarm within the construction community and city dwellers living in the shadow of large scale projects. Just 10 days later, a 20-foot crane section in Miami fell 30 stories, killing two construction workers and injuring five. New Yorkers, already jittery from the first crane collapse, saw another crane fall in their city May 30, which killed two construction workers and injured one worker and one bystander. The first New York crane collapse garnered much media attention because of the scale of the event - a high death toll among workers and a visitor killed when the crane's boom crushed a residential building. But injury and death to bystanders is not a first-time occurrence. Selected examples of crane-related bystander deaths collected from news reports are included in Table 1. In 2003, OSHA formed a Crane and Derrick Negotiated Rulemaking Advisory Committee (CDAC) of representatives from industry, labor and government to develop a new safety standard for the construction industry to aid in reducing the number of fatalities. The committee first met in July 2003, and reached a consensus on regulatory language for the new standard on July 9, 2004. In May 2008, OSHA published its semiannual agenda and announced that the proposed crane standard will be published for public comment in the Federal Register in August 2008. In light of the large number of recent fatalities, CPWR examined the data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to evaluate trends over time and propose recommendations to prevent future injury and death.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-equipment; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Traumatic-injuries; Machine-operation; Machine-operators; Regulations
Contact
The Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), 8484 Georgia Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Publication Date
20080617
Document Type
Other
Email Address
mwatters@cpwr.com
Funding Type
Construction; Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
Crane-Related Deaths in Construction and Recommendations for their Prevention
State
MD
Performing Organization
CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, Silver Spring, Maryland
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