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International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations.

Authors
Sigurdson-AJ; Ha-M; Hauptmann-M; Bhatti-P; Sram-RJ; Beskid-O; Tawn-EJ; Whitehouse-CA; Lindholm-C; Nakano-M; Kodama-Y; Nakamura-N; Vorobtsova-I; Oestreicher-U; Stephan-G; Yong-LC; Bauchinger-M; Schmid-E; Chung-HW; Darroudi-F; Roy-L; Voisin-P; Barquinero-JF; Livingston-G; Blakey-D; Hayata-I; Zhang-W; Wang-CY; Bennett-LM; Littlefield-LG; Edwards-AA; Kleinerman-RA; Tucker-JD
Source
Mutat Res Genet Toxicol Environ Mutagen 2008 Apr; 652(2):112-121
NIOSHTIC No.
20034078
Abstract
Chromosome translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal, healthy humans increase with age, but the effects of gender, race, and cigarette smoking on background translocation yields have not been examined systematically. Further, the shape of the relationship between age and translocation frequency (TF) has not been definitively determined. We collected existing data from 16 laboratories in North America, Europe, and Asia on TFs measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridization whole chromosome painting among 1933 individuals. In Poisson regression models, age, ranging from newborns (cord blood) to 85 years, was strongly associated with TF and this relationship showed significant upward curvature at older ages versus a linear relationship (p < 0.001). Ever smokers had significantly higher TFs than non-smokers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.30) and smoking modified the effect of age on TFs with a steeper age-related increase among ever smokers compared to non-smokers (p < 0.00 1). TFs did not differ by gender. Interpreting an independent effect of race was difficult owing to laboratory variation. Our study is three times larger than any pooled effort to date, confirming a suspected curvilinear relationship of TF with age. The significant effect of cigarette smoking has not been observed with previous pooled studies of TF in humans. Our data provide stable estimates of background TF by age, gender, race, and smoking status and suggest an acceleration of chromosome damage above age 60 and among those with a history of smoking cigarettes.
Keywords
Biological-monitoring; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Statistical-analysis; Cell-biology; Cell-growth; Cell-transformation; Cellular-structures; Age-factors; Age-groups; Genetic-factors; Racial-factors; Smoking
Contact
James D. Tucker, Wayne State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, 1370 Biol Sci Bldg 5047 Gullen Mall, Detroit, MI 48202
CODEN
MRGMFI
Publication Date
20080401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1383-5718
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities
Source Name
Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Enfironmental Mutagenesis
State
MI; MD; OH
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