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Gestational exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate suppresses immune function in B6C3F1 mice.

Authors
Keil-DE; Mehlmann-T; Butterworth-L; Peden-Adams-MM
Source
Toxicol Sci 2008 May; 103(1):77-85
NIOSHTIC No.
20034049
Abstract
Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) are used in a multitude of applications and are categorized as high-production volume chemicals produced in quantities exceeding 10,000 lbs/year. As a result, widespread exposure has been documented in adults, children, and infants. It is generally accepted that children are more sensitive to the effects of xenobiotic exposures during fetal and postnatal periods of development; therefore, considerable efforts are required to investigate the potential impact of a model PFAA, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on children's immunological health. Using the pairing of female C57BL/6N mice with male C3H/HeJ, developmental immunotoxicity was evaluated in B6C3F1 pups following oral maternal exposure to PFOS on gestations days 1-17. Exposure levels included 0.1, 1, and 5 mg/kg/day PFOS. Natural killer (NK) cell activity, SRBC IgM plaque assay, CD4/8 lymphocytic subpopulations, nitrite production in peritoneal macrophages, and body/organ weights were evaluated at 4 and 8 weeks of age in F1 pups. No significant dose-responsive changes in maternal or pup body weights, flow cytometry, or macrophage function were observed, yet hepatomegaly was indicated in F1 male pups at 4 weeks of age. Functional deficits were not evident until 8 weeks of age when NK cell function and IgM production were significantly decreased. When compared with females, male pups were more sensitive to the effects of PFOS thereby establishing a no observed adverse effect level and low observed adverse effect level of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg/day (males only) following maternal PFOS exposure level, respectively. This study establishes that the developing immune system is sensitive to the effects of PFOS and results in functional deficits in innate and humoral immunity detectable at adulthood.
Keywords
Histopathology; Immunotoxins; Laboratory-animals; Animals; Animal-studies; Age-factors; Immune-reaction; Immune-system; Immune-system-disorders
Contact
Deborah E. Keil, Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Nevada, 4505 Maryland Pkwy, Box 453021, Las Vegas, NV 89154-3021
CODEN
TOSCF2
Publication Date
20080501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
deborah.keil@unlv.edu
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1096-6080
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Toxicological Sciences
State
WV; SC; NV
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