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Evaluation of a supermarket intervention to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables.

Authors
Kristal-AR; Goldenhar-L; Muldoon-J; Morton-RF
Source
Am J Health Promot 1997 Jul-Aug; 11(6):422-425
NIOSHTIC No.
20034021
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a supermarket point-of-purchase intervention could increase shoppers' consumption of fruits and vegetables. METHODS: Eight supermarkets in rural Iowa were randomized to receive either an 8-month intervention or no intervention. The intervention consisted of: (1) one-page supermarket flyers that identified fruits and vegetables on sale, gave receipts and menu ideas for using sale foods, and gave a store coupon worth 50 cents toward the purchase of any fruit or vegetable; (2) store signage to identify fruits and vegetables featured on the flyer; and (3) consciousness raising activities such as food demonstrations and nutrition related signage. Evaluation was based on exit interviews and take-home surveys, completed by random samples of 120 shoppers from each store at baseline and approximately 1-year post randomization. RESULTS: At follow-up, 42.9% of intervention store shoppers and 6.5% of control shoppers recalled seeing the intervention flyer. Thirty-six percent of intervention shoppers had used a 50-cent coupon and 18% had used a recipe. Approximately 70% of all shoppers had purchased fruits or vegetables on the day they were interviewed, which did not differ between intervention and control stores. Compared to change in control shoppers, there was a borderline statistically significant 8.4 percentage point increase (p < .07) in the percentage of intervention store shoppers in the action or maintenance stages of dietary change, but there was no corresponding increase in fruit or vegetable consumption. DISCUSSION: Studies to test point-of-purchase interventions are difficult to design, implement, and evaluate. More powerful interventions are probably necessary to induce shoppers to purchase and consume more fruits and vegetables.
Keywords
Diet; Dietary-effects; Behavior-patterns; Behavioral-testing; Food; Grocery-stores; Psychological-factors; Psychological-processes; Psychological-testing
Contact
A. Kristal, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Cancer Prevention Research Program, 1124 Columbia, MP-702, Seattle, WA 98104
CODEN
AJHPED
Publication Date
19970701
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
487561
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Agriculture
Fiscal Year
1997
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U03-CCU-506139
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0890-1171
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Journal of Health Promotion
State
WA; OH; MI
Performing Organization
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
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