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Reduction of respirable silica following the introduction of water spray applications in Indian stone crusher mills.

Authors
Gottesfeld-P; Nicas-M; Kephart-JW; Balakrishnan-K; Rinehart-R
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health 2008 Apr-Jun 14(2):94-103
NIOSHTIC No.
20034004
Abstract
Respirable crystalline silica dust generated during stone crushing operations has been linked to chronic lung disease and increased risk of tuberculosis. In India, most stone crushing mills operate without any dust control or containment systems. This investigation in the Khurda District of Orissa demonstrated a reduction in respirable particulate mass following the application of a fine mist of water. Average respirable quartz and cristobalite levels declined 82% and 69%, respectively, after water spray controls were installed. This finding suggests that relatively inexpensive modifications that are available in the local market can be effective at reducing silica exposures. Although average exposure levels, particularly during the dry season, may exceed the Permissible Exposure Limit for silica, the overall reductions observed were substantial. Widespread adoption of this simple control technology by stone crushers in India could have a positive public health impact.
Keywords
Stone-processing; Stone-grinders; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Dust-exposure; Dust-inhalation; Engineering-controls; Dust-control; Silica-dusts; Quartz-dust; Control-technology; Control-methods
Contact
P. Gottesfeld, Occupational Knowledge International, San Francisco, CA 94104, USA
CODEN
IOEHFU
CAS No.
14808-60-7
Publication Date
20080401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
pgottesfeld@okinternational.org
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1077-3525
NIOSH Division
EID
Priority Area
Manufacturing; Mining
Source Name
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health
State
DC
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