Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Temporal variability and predictors of urinary bisphenol A concentrations in men and women.

Authors
Mahalingaiah-S; Meeker-JD; Pearson-KR; Calafat-AM; Ye-X; Petrozza-J; Hauser-R
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2008 Feb; 116(2):173-178
NIOSHTIC No.
20033861
Abstract
Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is used to manufacture polymeric materials, such as polycarbonate plastics, and is found in a variety of consumer products. Recent data show widespread BPA exposure among the U.S. population. Objective: Our goal in the present study was to determine the temporal variability and predictors of BPA exposure. Methods: We measured urinary concentrations of BPA among male and female patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. Results: Between 2004 and 2006, 217 urine samples were collected from 82 subjects: 45 women (145 samples) and 37 men (72 samples) . Of these, 24 women and men were partners and contributed 42 pairs of samples collected on the same day. Ten women became pregnant during the follow-up period. Among the 217 urine samples, the median BPA concentration was 1.20 g/L, ranging from below the limit of detection (0.4 g/L) to 42.6 g/L. Age, body mass index, and sex were not significant predictors of urinary BPA concentrations. BPA urinary concentrations among pregnant women were 26% higher (-26%, +115%) than those among the same women when not pregnant (p > 0.05) . The urinary BPA concentrations of the female and male partner on the same day were correlated (r = 0.36 ; p = 0.02) . The sensitivity of classifying a subject in the highest tertile using a single urine sample was 0.64. Conclusion: We found a nonsignificant increase in urinary BPA concentrations in women while pregnant compared with nonpregnant samples from the same women. Samples collected from partners on the same day were correlated, suggesting shared sources of exposure. Finally, a single urine sample showed moderate sensitivity for predicting a subject's tertile categorization.
Keywords
Reproductive-system-disorders; Women; Environmental-exposure; Urinalysis; Urine-chemistry; Chemical-hypersensitivity; Pregnancy; Work-environment; Men
Contact
Russ Hauser, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, 665 Huntington Ave., Building 1, Room 1405, Boston, MA 02115
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
80-05-7
Publication Date
20080201
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008578
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard University, School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
TOP