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Promoting alertness with a short nap during a night shift.

Authors
Sallinen-M; Harma-M; Akerstedt-T; Rosa-R; Lillqvist-O
Source
J Sleep Res 1998 Dec; 7(4):240-247
NIOSHTIC No.
20033826
Abstract
The use of a short (< 1 h) nap in improving alertness during the early morning hours in the first night shift was examined under laboratory conditions. The study contained four experimental, non-consecutive night shifts with a nap of either 50 or 30 min at 01.00 or 04.00 hours. An experimental night shift without a nap served as a control condition. Each experimental shift was followed by daytime sleep. Fourteen experienced male shift workers went through all of the experimental conditions. The results showed that the naps improved the ability eo respond to visual signals during the second half of the night shift. Physiological sleepiness was alleviated by the early naps, as measured 50 min after awakening, but not at the end of the shift. Subjective sleepiness was somewhat decreased by the naps. The naps produced sleep inertia which lasted for about 10 15 min. Daytime sleep was somewhat impaired by the 50 min naps. The study shows that a nap shorter than I h is able to improve alertness to a certain extent during the first night shift.
Keywords
Shift-work; Sleep-deprivation; Physiological-effects; Physiological-factors; Physiological-fatigue; Physiological-measurements; Physiological-response; Physiological-testing; Author Keywords: daytime sleep; nap; night shift; sleep inertia; sleepiness
Contact
Mikael Sallinen Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Physiology, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250 Helsinki, Finland
CODEN
JSRSEU
Publication Date
19981201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
Mikael.Sallinen@occuphealth.fi
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0962-1105
NIOSH Division
OD
Source Name
Journal of Sleep Research
State
GA
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