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Organic solvent exposure and hearing loss in a cohort of aluminium workers.

Authors
Rabinowitz-PM; Galusha-D; Slade-MD; Dixon-Ernst-C; O'Neill-A; Fiellin-M; Cullen-MR
Source
Occup Environ Med 2008 Apr; 65(4):222-223
NIOSHTIC No.
20033681
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Organic solvent exposure has been shown to cause hearing loss in animals and humans. Less is known about the risk of hearing loss due to solvent exposures typically found in US industry. The authors performed a retrospective cohort study to examine the relationship between solvent exposure and hearing loss in US aluminium industry workers. METHODS: A cohort of 1319 workers aged 35 years or less at inception was followed for 5 years. Linkage of employment, industrial hygiene and audiometric surveillance records allowed for estimation of noise and solvent exposures and hearing loss rates over the study period. Study subjects were classified as "solvent exposed" or not, on the basis of industrial hygiene records linked with individual job histories. High frequency hearing loss was modelled as both a continuous and a dichotomous outcome. RESULTS: Typical solvent exposures involved mixtures of xylene, toluene and/or methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). Recorded solvent exposure levels varied widely both within and between jobs. In a multivariate logistic model, risk factors for high frequency hearing loss included age (OR = 1.06, p = 0.004), hunting or shooting (OR = 1.35, p = 0.049), noisy hobbies (OR = 1.74, p = 0.01), baseline hearing level (OR = 1.04, p<0.001) and solvent exposure (OR = 1.87, p = 0.004). A multivariate linear regression analysis similarly found significant associations between high frequency hearing loss and age (p<0.001), hunting or shooting (p<0.001), noisy hobbies (p = 0.03), solvent exposure (p<0.001) and baseline hearing (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that occupational exposure to organic solvent mixtures is a risk factor for high frequency hearing loss, although the data do not allow conclusions about dose-response relationships. Industries with solvent-exposed workers should include such workers in hearing conservation programs.
Keywords
Audiological-testing; Audiometry; Auditory-system; Hearing-level; Hearing-threshold; Hearing-impairment; Hearing-loss; Hearing-disorders; Solvents; Chemical-hypersensitivity; Chemical-analysis; Mathematical-models; Noise-sources; Occupational-exposure; Organic-solvents; Dose-response; Hearing-tests
Contact
Assistant Professor P. M. Rabinowitz, Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program, Yale University School of Medicine, 135 College Street, Suite 392, New Haven, CT 06510
CODEN
OEMEEM
CAS No.
7429-90-5; 1330-20-7; 108-88-3
Publication Date
20080401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
peter.rabinowitz@yale.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007724
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
1351-0711
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
CT; PA
Performing Organization
Yale University
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