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Challenges in residential fall prevention: insight from apprentice carpenters.

Authors
Lipscomb-HJ; Dale-AM; Kaskutas-V; Sherman-Voellinger-R; Evanoff-B
Source
Am J Ind Med 2008 Jan; 51(1):60-68
NIOSHTIC No.
20033343
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Falls remain a serious source of morbidity and mortality in residential construction despite considerable knowledge of risk factors and prevention strategies. While training is universally viewed as positive, we know little about its effectiveness in preventing residential falls. METHODS: A series of focus groups were conducted with union apprentice carpenters (n = 36) at varied levels of training to elicit input on factors that might influence the effectiveness of residential fall prevention training, including hazard awareness, timing of elements of formal instruction, jobsite mentoring, and workplace norms. RESULTS: While apprentices identified many residential fall hazards, they voiced little concern about work near unprotected vertical or horizontal openings such as stairwells, window openings or leading edges. On residential jobs, apprentices worked at heights immediately and were often exposed to hazards they had not yet been trained to handle. The quality of mentoring varied tremendously, and things they had been taught in school were often not the norm on these small worksites. Use of fall arrest equipment was uncommon. Job insecurity in this fast-paced work environment influenced behaviors even when apprentices reported knowledge of safe procedures; this was more of a problem for less experienced apprentices. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide compelling evidence that apprentices often do not apply safety principles they have been taught in school in the actual work environment, illuminating how attempts to empower workers through training alone can fall short. The findings have policy implications and demonstrate the importance of measuring more than knowledge when evaluating effectiveness of training.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-materials; Construction-workers; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Epidemiology; Surveillance-programs; Statistical-analysis; Training; Workplace-studies; Work-operations
Contact
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Box 3834, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20080101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
hester.lipscomb@duke.edu
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Construction
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0271-3586
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
NC; MO; MD
Performing Organization
Center to Protect Workers' Rights
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