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Bacterial population dynamics in dairy waste during aerobic and anaerobic treatment and subsequent storage.

Authors
McGarvey-JA; Miller-WG; Zhang-R; Ma-Y; Mitloehner-F
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol 2007 Jan; 73(1):193-202
NIOSHTIC No.
20033282
Abstract
The objective of this study was to model a typical dairy waste stream, monitor the chemical and bacterial population dynamics that occur during aerobic or anaerobic treatment and subsequent storage in a simulated lagoon, and compare them to those of waste held without treatment in a simulated lagoon. Both aerobic and anaerobic treatment methods followed by storage effectively reduced the levels of total solids (59 to 68%), biological oxygen demand (85 to 90%), and sulfate (56 to 65%), as well as aerobic (83 to 95%), anaerobic (80 to 90%), and coliform (>99%) bacteria. However, only aerobic treatment reduced the levels of ammonia, and anaerobic treatment was more effective at reducing total sulfur and sulfate. The bacterial population structure of waste before and after treatment was monitored using 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries. Both treatments had unique effects on the bacterial population structure of waste. Aerobic treatment resulted in the greatest change in the type of bacteria present, with the levels of eight out of nine phyla being significantly altered. The most notable differences were the >16-fold increase in the phylum Proteobacteria and the approximately 8-fold decrease in the phylum Firmicutes. Anaerobic treatment resulted in fewer alterations, but significant decreases in the phyla Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and increases in the phyla Planctomycetes, Spirochetes, and TM7 were observed.
Keywords
Bacteria; Bacterial-cultures; Aerobic-metabolism; Dairy-products; Storage-containers; Storage-facilities; Chelating-agents; Chemical-analysis; Chemical-deposition; Chemical-extraction; Containers; Contaminated-food; Agricultural-chemicals; Waste-disposal-systems; Monitoring-systems; Monitors; Ribonucleic-acids
Contact
J. A. McGarvey, Foodborne Contaminants Research Unit, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA 94710
CODEN
AEMIDF
Publication Date
20070101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
McGarvey@pw.usda.gov
Funding Type
Agriculture; Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U50-OH-007550
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0099-2240
Source Name
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California - Davis
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