Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Regression models for predicting peak and continuous three-dimensional spinal loads during symmetric and asymmetric lifting tasks.

Authors
Fathallah-FA; Marras-WS; Parnianpour-M
Source
Hum Factors 1999 Sep; 41(3):373-388
NIOSHTIC No.
20033280
Abstract
Most biomechanical assessments of spinal loading during industrial work have focused on estimating peak spinal compressive forces under static and sagittally symmetric conditions. The main objective of this study was to explore the potential of feasibly predicting three-dimensional (3D) spinal loading in industry from various combinations of trunk kinematics, kinetics, and subject-load characteristics. The study used spinal loading, predicted by a validated electromyography-assisted model, from 11 male participants who performed a series of symmetric and asymmetric lifts. Three classes of models were developed: (a) models using workplace, subject, and trunk motion parameters as independent variables (kinematic models); (b) models using workplace, subject, and measured moments variables (kinetic models); and (c) models incorporating workplace, subject, trunk motion, and measured moments variables (combined models). The results showed that peak 3D spinal loading during symmetric and asymmetric lifting were predicted equally well using all three types of regression models. Continuous 3D loading was predicted best using the combined models. When the use of such models is infeasible, the kinematic models can provide adequate predictions. Finally, lateral shear forces (peak and continuous) were consistently underestimated using all three types of models. The study demonstrated the feasibility of predicting 3D loads on the spine under specific symmetric and asymmetric lifting tasks without the need for collecting EMG information. However, further validation and development of the models should be conducted to assess and extend their applicability to lifting conditions other than those presented in this study. Actual or potential applications of this research include exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, ergonomic intervention, and laboratory task assessment.
Keywords
Ergonomics; Spinal-cord; Spinal-cord-disorders; Spinal-shock; Task-performance; Biomechanical-modeling; Biomechanics; Industrial-design; Industrial-equipment; Industrial-factory-workers; Industrial-hazards; Industrial-safety; Kinetics; Workers; Workplace-monitoring; Workplace-studies; Laboratory-techniques; Laboratory-testing; Laboratory-work; Manual-lifting; Models
Contact
F. A. Fathallah, University of California, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, One Shields Ave., Davis CA 95616
CODEN
HUFAA6
Publication Date
19990901
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
1055222
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U07-CCU-906162
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0018-7208
Source Name
Human Factors
State
CA; OH
Performing Organization
University of California - Davis
TOP