Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and the modifying influence of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study.

Authors
Rajan-P; Kelsey-KT; Schwartz-JD; Bellinger-DC; Weuve-J; Sparrow-D; Spiro 3rd-A; Smith-TJ; Nie-H; Hu-H; Wright-RO
Source
Am J Epidemiol 2007 Dec; 166(12):1400-1408
NIOSHTIC No.
20033207
Abstract
The authors evaluated the association between lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and its potential modification by a delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism. Lead measurements in blood or bone and self-reported ratings on the Brief Symptom Inventory from 1991 to 2002 were available for 1,075 US men participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study. The authors estimated the prevalence odds ratio for the association between interquartile-range lead and abnormal symptom score, adjusting for potential confounders. An interquartile increment in tibia lead (14 microg/g) was associated with 21% higher odds of somatization (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.01, 1.46). An interquartile increment in patella lead (20 microg/g) corresponded to a 23% increase in the odds of global distress (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.47). An interquartile increment in blood lead (2.8 microg/dl) was associated with 14% higher odds of hostility (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.27). In all other analyses, lead was nonsignificantly associated with psychiatric symptoms. The adverse association of lead with abnormal mood scores was generally stronger among ALAD 1-1 carriers than 1-2/2-2 carriers, particularly regarding phobic anxiety symptoms (p(interaction) = 0.004). These results augment evidence of a deleterious association between lead and psychiatric symptoms.
Keywords
Blood-analysis; Blood-sampling; Blood-tests; Lead-absorption; Lead-compounds; Lead-poisoning; Physical-chemistry; Physical-reactions; Physiological-chemistry; Physiological-disorders; Physiological-effects; Physiological-factors; Physiological-function; Physiological-measurements; Physiological-response; Physiopathology; Psychological-disorders; Psychological-factors; Psychological-reactions; Psychological-responses; Risk-factors; Age-factors; Age-groups; Military-personnel; Medical-care; Medical-monitoring; Cell-morphology; Cell-metabolism; Cellular-reactions
Contact
Dr. Pradeep Rajan, Bureau of Environmental Disease Prevention, Division of Environmental Health, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 253 Broadway, 12th Floor, CN #58, New York, NY 10007
CODEN
AJEPAS
CAS No.
7439-92-1
Publication Date
20071215
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
prajan@health.nyc.gov
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416
Issue of Publication
12
ISSN
0002-9262
Source Name
American Journal of Epidemiology
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
TOP