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Evaluating the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles by measuring oxidative stress potential - a workshop report and consensus statement.

Authors
Ayres-JG; Borm-P; Cassee-F; Castranova-V; Donaldson-K; Ghio-A; Harrison-RM; Hider-R; Kelly-F; Kooter-I; Marano-F; Maynard-RL; Mudway-I; Nel-A; Sioutas-C; Smith-S; Baeza-Squiban-A; Cho-A; Duggan-S; Froines-J
Source
Inhal Toxicol 2008 Jan; 20(1):75-99
NIOSHTIC No.
20033191
Abstract
Background: There is a strong need for laboratory in vitro test systems for the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles. The measurement of oxidative stress potential offers a promising way forward. Objectives: a workshop was convened involving leading workers from the field in order to review the available test methods and to generate a Consensus Statement. Discussions: workshop participants summarised their own research activities as well as discussion of the relative merits of different test methods. Conclusions: in vitro test methods have an important role to play in the screening of toxicity in airborne particulate matter and nanoparti- cles. In vitro cell challenges were preferable to in vitro acellular systems but both have a potential major role to play and offer large cost advantages relative to human or animal inhalation studies and animal in vivo installation experiments. There remains a need to compare tests one with another on standardised samples and also to establish a correlation with the results of population-based epidemiology.
Keywords
Sampling; Sampling-methods; Analytical-methods; Air-contamination; Air-quality-measurement; Air-samples; Air-sampling-techniques; Airborne-dusts; Airborne-particles; Particle-aerodynamics; Particulate-dust; Particulate-sampling-methods; Particulates; Dust-analysis; Dust-exposure; Toxic-effects; Cell-biology; Cell-differentiation; Cellular-reactions; Oxidative-metabolism; Nanotechnology
Contact
Roy M. Harrison, Division of Environmental Health & Risk Management, School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
CODEN
INHTE5
Publication Date
20080101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
r.m.harrison@bham.ac.uk
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0895-8378
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Inhalation Toxicology
State
WV; NC; CA
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