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Organophosphate pesticide exposure and neurodevelopment in young Mexican-American children.

Authors
Eskenazi-B; Marks-AR; Bradman-A; Harley-K; Barr-DB; Johnson-C; Morga-N; Jewell-NP
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2007 May; 115(5):792-798
NIOSHTIC No.
20033055
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are widely used in agriculture and homes. Animal studies suggest that even moderate doses are neurodevelopmental toxicants, but there are few studies in humans. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship of prenatal and child OP urinary metabolite levels with children's neurodevelopment. METHODS: Participating children were from a longitudinal birth cohort of primarily Latino farm-worker families in California. We measured six nonspecific dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites in maternal and child urine as well as metabolites specific to malathion (MDA) and chlorpyrifos (TCPy) in maternal urine. We examined their association with children's performance at 6 (n = 396), 12 (n = 395), and 24 (n = 372) months of age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development [Mental Development (MDI) and Psychomotor Development (PDI) Indices] and mother's report on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (n = 356). RESULTS: Generally, pregnancy DAP levels were negatively associated with MDI, but child measures were positively associated. At 24 months of age, these associations reached statistical significance [per 10-fold increase in prenatal DAPs: beta = -3.5 points; 95% confidence interval (CI), -6.6 to -0.5; child DAPs: beta = 2.4 points; 95% CI, 0.5 to 4.2]. Neither prenatal nor child DAPs were associated with PDI or CBCL attention problems, but both prenatal and postnatal DAPs were associated with risk of pervasive developmental disorder [per 10-fold increase in prenatal DAPs: odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, p = 0.05; child DAPs OR = 1.7, p = 0.04]. MDA and TCPy were not associated with any outcome. CONCLUSIONS: We report adverse associations of prenatal DAPs with mental development and pervasive developmental problems at 24 months of age. Results should be interpreted with caution given the observed positive relationship with postnatal DAPs.
Keywords
Pregnancy; Children; Prenatal-exposure; Risk-factors; Risk-analysis; Exposure-levels; Exposure-assessment; Sampling-methods; Biological-monitoring; Health-hazards; Health-surveys; Blood-analysis; Blood-sampling; Animal-studies; Neurotoxic-effects; Neurotoxins; Statistical-analysis
Contact
Center for Children's Environmental Health Research, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7380
CODEN
EVHPAZ
Publication Date
20070501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
eskenazi@berkeley.edu
Funding Amount
909365
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2007
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007400
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California, Berkeley
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