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Observed finger behaviour during computer mouse use.

Authors
Lee-DL; McLoone-H; Dennerlein-JT
Source
Appl Ergon 2008 Jan; 39(1):107-113
NIOSHTIC No.
20033028
Abstract
Two-button computer mouse users may exhibit sustained, static finger lifting behaviours to prevent inadvertent activations by avoiding finger pressure on the buttons, which leads to prolonged, static finger extensor muscle loading. One hundred graduate students were observed during normal computer work in a university computer facility to qualify and quantify the prevalence of lifted finger behaviours and extended finger postures, as well as wrist/forearm and grip behaviour, during specific mouse activities. The highest prevalences observed were 48% of the students lifted their middle finger during mouse drag activities, and 23% extended their middle finger while moving the mouse. In addition, 98% of the students rested their wrist and forearm (77%) or wrist only (21%) on the workstation surface, and 97% had an extended wrist posture (15 degrees -30 degrees ) when using the mouse. Potential applications of these findings include future computer input device designs to reduce finger lifting behaviour and exposures to risk factors of hand/forearm musculoskeletal pain.
Keywords
Muscle-physiology; Musculoskeletal-system; Physical-stress; Physiological-factors; Injury-prevention; Ergonomics; Humans; Biomechanics; Computer-equipment; Equipment-design; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Muscle-physiology; Muscle-function
Contact
Jack T. Dennerlein, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
CODEN
AERGBW
Publication Date
20080101
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0003-6870
Source Name
Applied Ergonomics
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
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