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Race, occupation, and lung cancer: detecting disparities with death certificate data.

Authors
Birdsey-J; Alterman-T; Petersen-MR
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2007 Nov; 49(11):1257-1263
NIOSHTIC No.
20032887
Abstract
Objectives: To determine whether the analysis of death certificate data would reveal the same relationship among race, occupational exposure, and lung cancer mortality observed by a large cohort study. Methods: An occupation-specific mortality odds ratio (MOR) for lung cancer (ICD-162) versus all other causes was calculated for 218,341 black men and white men who had been employed in the metal industries. Results: Black men were at increased risk for lung cancer mortality when compared with white men among the 4668 oven workers (MOR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.73), but not among the 33,605 white-collar workers (MOR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.23). Conclusions: Our findings corroborate a previously demonstrated association among exposure to carcinogenic coke oven emissions, race, and lung cancer mortality, and support the use of death certificate data to help identify occupations with racial disparities in lung cancer mortality.
Keywords
Racial-factors; Lung; Lung-cells; Lung-disease; Lung-disorders; Metal-workers; Pneumoconiosis; Cancer-rates; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Statistical-analysis; Quantitative-analysis; Mathematical-models; Surveillance-programs
Contact
Jan Birdsey, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, MS-R17, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20071101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
JBirdsey@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1076-2752
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH
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